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Today's News

  • Lady Tigers pick up big wins

    After dropping games against Midway, Tellico Plains and Grace Christian Academy over the past couple of weeks, it appeared that a once promising season for the Rockwood Lady Tigers was going up in flames.

  • Jackets sting Tigers in five innings, 13-3

    The Rockwood Tigers and Kingston Yellow Jackets closed out the regular season Wednesday evening with Kingston handing the Tigers a 13-3 setback at Rockwood’s Mike “Brillo” Miller Sports Complex.

  • Church sanctuary burns

    Kingston United Methodist Church’s sanctuary was destroyed in an electrical fire Saturday evening.

    Pastor John C. Anderson was mowing the parsonage’s lawn next door when he noticed the church was on fire.

    Anderson called 911 at approximately 7 p.m. He checked himself to make sure no one was in the building.

    “The building can be built back. I’m just thankful no one was hurt,” Anderson said at the scene Saturday. “The way I look at it, the building isn’t the church; the people are.”

  • READERS VOICES: Your comments on the killing of Osama bin Laden

    Tim Crass, Sequoyah Shores subdivision: “It’s been a long time coming. He lived 12 years that he shouldn’t have lived. They should have killed him a year before he attacked the towers in New York. If they had done that we would still have those towers. That’s why I’m saying 12 years.”

    Steven Robinette, local mixed martial arts instructor: “I want to see the body.”

  • Bin Laden burial at sea: Roane Countian on ship

    Sandra Steele is a little closer to history these days.

    Her son, Rockwood High School graduate Chad Steele, is a sailor on board the USS Carl Vinson, the ship that carried out Osama bin Laden’s burial at sea after the terrorist leader was killed.

    “Me and my husband are so proud,” she said. “We’re just about to bust.”

    Bin Laden, the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks and America’s most wanted man, was killed by U.S. Navy SEALs who were sent in to find him at his compound in Pakistan.

  • Second THP building placed on register

    The second of Rockwood’s two old Tennessee Highway Patrol buildings has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    The first, which fronts Kingston Avenue, was added to the list in 2001.

    This year, an amendment to the registry adds the second one, which fronts Gateway Avenue.

    A museum is in the Kingston Avenue building.

  • Eagle Furnace may get cable

    Residents in the Eagle Furnace area may someday get the opportunity to have cable television and natural gas.

    Ron Berry, who sat as the interim general manager of Rockwood Water, Sewer and Gas and is helping transition new manager Kimberly Ramsey, has recommended looking at extending gas service to the customers in this area and approaching Comcast about sharing the cost of the ditch to extend cable to that area as well.

  • What’s next for America now that bin Laden is gone?

    Public Enemy No. 1 for America and for much of the rest of the world is dead.
    Osama bin Laden was killed in his compound in Pakistan by a Navy Seals team, putting an end to his lengthy, personal reign of terror.
    We’ll still have more terrorists to deal with. Killing one man, no matter how high he ranks, will not put an end to hatred, cruelty and misunderstanding.
    For all the death and destruction bin Laden has left in his wake, it strikes us that his worst blow to America was what he did to us as a people.

  • IMPRESSIONS by Johnny Teglas: Warm fuzzies from gala, then pleasant dreams

    There’s something about sitting around a banquet table surrounded by old and new friends — and letting your hair down.
    Of course, you have to have some hair to do that last part. The round, gray-headed guy has closely cropped locks.
    Yet, that didn’t prevent the Teglas clan from doing exactly that Friday evening at Whitestone Country Inn.

  • Woody demands better terms before more investment in Plateau Park

    Part of Gov. Bill Haslam’s strategy for bringing jobs to Tennessee is getting rural communities to work together to spur economic development.              
    “The only way they’re going to do that is if they don’t get in a bind like Roane County, and one county pays for it and another county reaps all the benefits,” said Roane County Executive Ron Woody.
    Roane, Cumberland and Morgan counties could be a test case of how well multi-county alliances work.