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Today's News

  • HUB warehouse may cost $17.5 million

    Harriman Utility Board’s dream warehouse facility could be a costly one.

    Among the features would be  an outdoor classroom area and public walking trail along Hannah Creek and a fitness center.

    The price, if the facility is built according to plan, would be around $17.5 million for the site improvements and facility on the 38-acre tract on farmland in north Harriman on Hwy. 27.

    Those estimates are conservative, according to officials with McGill Associates.

  • 20 apply for Rockwood utility chief job

    Rockwood is seeing no shortage of interest in the Rockwood Water, Sewer and Natural Gas manager position.

    Twenty people have applied, although officials weren’t publicly naming names.

    The Rockwood City Council, which has served as the utility board since it was dissolved last year, narrowed that list down to six to invite for an interview.

    During the applicant review last Monday, the council referred to each application by number, not name.

  • Cawood legal decision has ripples

    The legal community is feeling the repercussions of a Tennessee Supreme Court decision involving Kingston attorney Chris Cawood.

    After two unsuccessful attempts to have Cawood disciplined for a sexual tryst, the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility appealed to the Supreme Court.

    The court threw out the appeal on Dec. 20 because the board’s petition for certiorari  or appeal failed to meet the requirements of state law.

  • Jim Henry sworn in as state commissioner

    Kingston’s Jim Henry was sworn in as commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities on Monday.

    “There might have been 400 or 500 people there,” said Roane County Executive Ron Woody, who attended the event in Nashville.

    “The governor said I believe you got more people here than when I got inaugurated.”   

    Henry was chosen by Gov. Bill Haslam to lead the department back in December.

  • The Garden Gate: March on the mark for transition

    By Ellen Probert Williamson

  • Planned power outage to affect Kingston area

    Weather permitting, Rockwood Electric Utility has scheduled a power outage at its Kingston substation next weekend.

    The outage is scheduled to begin at 11 p.m. Saturday, March 19, and last through 5 a.m. Sunday, March 20.

    All customers served from this substation will be without electrical power during this time.

    Areas that will be affected include the corporate limits of the city of Kingston, South Hwy. 58, North Kentucky Street,  Race Street, and Lawnville Road.  

  • Kingston Lions getting ready to serve pancakes

    Now is the time for a super spring tonic, such as some hot pancakes made on the spot by members of the Kingston Lions Club.

    The club’s annual pancake breakfast will be from 7 to 11 a.m. March 26 in Kingston First Baptist Church’s family life center.

    Cost is $5 for adults, $2 for children younger than 12.

    Net proceeds of this event are used by the Lions primarily to purchase eye exams and/or glasses for people who cannot afford them.

  • MILITARY MATTERS: Matthew R. Crabtree

    U.S. Army Pfc. Matthew R. Crabtree recently graduated from basic combat training at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla.

    Son of Delbert Crabtree of Kingston, he graduated in 2006 from Midway High School.

    During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission and received instruction and training exercises in drill and ceremonies, Army history, core values and traditions.

  • MILITARY MATTERS: Samuel I. Selvidge

    U.S. Air Force Airman Samuel I. Selvidge recently graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio.

    Son of Deborah Selvidge of Kingston and Ronald Selvidge of Loudon, he graduated in 2005 from Loudon High School.

    The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

  • Blood donations in dire need

    Medic Regional Blood Center has issued an emergency need for blood.  

    The sole blood provider for 21 counties and 27 area hospitals  — including Roane Medical Center in Harriman — struggles to meet the demand for area patients.  

    “Our coverage area has been hit pretty hard the last week with very serious accidents, and those have taken a toll on an already-thin inventory,” said Christi Fightmaster of Medic public relations.