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Today's News

  • Bethel ministry has art classes for all ages

    Several hands-on arts opportunities are available in the next few weeks through Bethel Arts Ministry.

    The ministry, a program of Kingston’s Bethel Presbyterian Church, offers classes for all ages.

    All classes will be in the church at 203 S. Kentucky St. Call 376-6340 to register or for details.

    Micki Anderson, a state-certified art educator with 15 years of teaching experience, will continue children’s arts classes March 9-April 20.

  • DAR applauds OSHS’s Cannon as Good Citizen

    Oliver Springs High School student Dylan Wayne Cannon has been selected as a Daughters
    of the American Revolution Good Citizen for Clinch Bend Chapter, NSDAR.

    Cannon was selected for the honor by the school’s faculty and students.

    He will receive a certificate and pin from the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution.

    The DAR Good Citizen is nationally recognized by colleges and employers as an indication of potential for future success.

  • St. Andrew’s starts Lent with feast, Ash Wednesday services

    Two events at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Harriman, will mark the beginning of preparation for the most important holy day of the Christian year.

    An annual feast of pancakes will be served from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Shrove Tuesday, March 8, in the church at 190 Circle Drive. Two traditional Ash Wednesday services will take place at noon and 7 p.m. March 9.

  • Military families can drive with pride with state’s Blue Star plates

    One of Tennessee’s newest license plates gives relatives of members of the U.S. Armed Forces a way to display their support for the troops.

    The plates, issued under a new law sponsored by state Sen. Ken Yager, R-Harriman, are now available to residents whose spouse, parent, sibling or child is serving in the armed forces of the United States at the time of application.

    "Today, we live in a free country because of the sacrifices of our nation’s servicemen and women and their families,” Yager said.

  • Bowers taking Run, Walk for Education

    Bowers Elementary School, Harriman, will have its first-ever 5K Run and Walk for Education next weekend.

    The Bowers PTO fundraiser will be on March 12 on the school campus at 120 Breazeale St.

    Registration begins at 8 a.m.; the run and walk start at 9.

    Call the school at 882-1185 for details.

    Entrance fees are $25 for adults and $5 for ages 6-11; ages 5 and younger walk for free.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: Views from on high — and down under

    When the group I sometimes hike with decided to take on a 10-mile hike at Cumberland Gap National Historic Park, I hesitated.

    Ten miles is a long hike, and the long climb to the White Rocks and Sand Cave also is listed as strenuous.

    I was well aware of this fact.

    I had done this hike several times as a much younger woman when I lived on the edge of the park.

    I also knew the beauty that lay ahead.

    And so, last Saturday, I went with about a dozen other hardy hikers and began the 1,655-foot climb.

  • Roane teachers head to Nashville

    Local educators are planning to attend Saturday’s rally in support of teachers in Nashville.

    Participants will gather at the Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park at noon and march to Legislative Plaza.  

    The purpose of the rally is to protest legislation pending in the Tennessee General Assembly that will restrict teachers’ ability to collective bargain.

  • School board members support teachers

    The Roane County Board of Education and the Roane County Education Association are negotiating a new three-year contract.

    The current contract expires this year.  

    “We may be close to ratification of the new contract,” RCEA President Jeff Davis said by e-mail.

    Could this be the last one? Legislation pending in the Tennessee General Assembly could prevent the sides from negotiating in the future.

  • Tight quarters hinders recycling

    At the Roane County Recycling Center, space has become an issue.

    “It’s really hard to take care of everything that needs to be done,” said solid waste coordinator Ralph Stewart.

    Over the past five years, the recycling center’s intake of cardboard has soared from approximately 20 tons of cardboard a month to 20 tons a week.

    The center uses its only building to sort and bale all of the recyclables, some that can be sold.

  • Property tax appeals to state begin later this month

    Some of the property owners unhappy about the results of last year’s reappraisal will have their grievances heard later this month.

    The Tennessee Board of Equalization will hold hearings in Roane County on March 21, March 23 and March 25.

    Forty-two people are scheduled to have their appeals heard over those three days.

    “This is just the first round of hearings,” Tennessee Comptroller spokesman Blake Fontenay said by e-mail.“There are many more appeals to be heard.”