.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Busy weekend for Babahatchie
  • School board cited

    Roane County Board of Education was recently recognized as a Board of Distinction by the Tennessee School Boards Association.

    TSBA’s Board of Distinction Program recognizes outstanding performance by a school board as a whole in the areas of planning, policy, promotion and board development.  

    To qualify, boards must meet specific standards within a two-year period.

  • General Sessions Court

    Editor’s note: Readers are cautioned that some names may be the same as or similar to other members of the community.

    Nancy L. Dukes, financial responsibility Feb. 1. Dismissed March 12, cost to state.

    Thomas W. Smalling, speeding Aug. 23, 2009. Dismissed March 12, cost to defendant.

    Thomas W. Smalling, financial responsibility Aug. 23. Dismissed March 12, cost to state.

    Brenda M. Boughton, speeding Aug. 26, 2009. Dismissed March 12, cost to defendant.

  • Houstons jailed again

    Frank V. Williams III is a no-nonsense judge, as brothers Rocky and Leon Houston found out the hard way on Thursday.

    Williams had both jailed for contempt after he ruled they were out of order in his courtroom.

    Rocky was first.

    “Arrest that man and take him to jail,” Williams ordered.

    Leon would suffer the same fate moments later.

    “Sheriff, arrest this man right here for contempt and take him to jail,” Williams said to deputies in the courtroom.

  • Hospital architect chosen

    Covenant Health has selected the architect who will be drawing the plans for a new hospital to replace Roane Medical Center’s current operations in downtown Harriman.

    Jodi Harris of Covenant’s marketing and public relations division said Knoxville-based The Lewis Group was selected to design the complex.

  • Last ash train leaves for Alabama

    The time-critical phase of the ash spill cleanup is over.

    The last train shipment of ash left the TVA Kingston Fossil Plant Wednesday evening.

    “It’s very exciting,” said Kathryn Nash, senior manager for operations for the cleanup. “A lot of people have put a lot of work into this, and a lot of hours.”

    Steve McCracken, general manager for the ash spill cleanup, said the last shipment was delayed a day because of rain.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: Who has rocks in their head? Probably me

    When my youngest brother, Rick, was in the first grade, and I was in the sixth, his teacher tapped on my classroom door and called me into the hall.

    Rick hovered behind her.

    She opened her palm, revealing an impressive pebble. I say impressive, because she said it came from Rick’s nose.

    “He says he didn’t put it in there,” the teacher said.

    I stared at her a minute, wondering if she had rocks in her head, then pulled Rick aside.

  • Rockwood prepares for Wassomless Christmas

    Rockwood 2000 has added a new event to its holiday extravaganza this weekend.

    On Friday evening, the celebration of the organization’s annual Christmas home tour will kickoff with a Christmas tree lighting at Rockwood’s Homecoming Park at 6:30.

    During the festivities members of the Crossville chapter of the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, an integral part of the home tour’s Civil War re-enactments, will present a plaque to the city in memory of Stan and Judy Wassom.

  • Rocky, Leon Houston arrested for contempt of court

    Brothers Rocky and Leon Houston were arrested Thursday morning after Chancellor Frank V. Williams III found them in contempt of court.

    The two men, who in 2006 were accused of murder in the shootings of a Roane County sheriff's deputy and ride-along friend, were in court to contest one of their lawyers taking Houston family property in payment for representing him.

    Leon was acquitted in the shootings, while Rocky was released as a result of a technical error by one of the judges in the case.

  • Time to give credit where credit is due

    We would be remiss in our duty if we did not, on these pages, acknowledge the the death of Henry Wattenbarger.
    Wattenbarger was a friend to this newspaper — and to many individuals and groups in and around the community.
    We sometimes wondered of Wattenbarger felt his contributions — and they were many — would be forgotten after he was gone.
    They won’t be — not by the people who knew him.
    Wattenbarger lived past the age of 90 and was one of the busiest retirees we have ever known.