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Today's News

  • 11 for 2011: A look ahead at top stories of the new year.

    Retrospectives are easy.  This year, we are looking to the future to anticipate, in no particular order, the top 11 stories of 2011.

  • 'Repulsive' lawyer wins again

    Attorney Chris Cawood got some good news a few days before Christmas.
    He came out victorious in his latest legal battle with the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility.
    The board sought to have Cawood disciplined for a sexual tryst he had with two women in his law office.
    The board’s own hearing panel and a judge determined no discipline was warranted.
    Instead of dropping the matter, the board appealed to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: May we ring in another great year together

    New Year’s Eve, 1999.

    It was an uncertain time in my life, and not just because of the looming new millennium.

    I had left Chicago and was transitioning out of a two-year freelance stint that hadn’t lived up to my expectations. Now I was tying up those lose ends and holding a temp job in the law firm of a large electric utility.

    As I sat around the TV with my brothers on that long-ago New Year’s Eve, my edginess wasn’t just over whether planes might fall out of the sky.

  • TVA employees help out

    TVA employees are providing food, gifts and other donations to children and families in need across the TVA service area this holiday season.
    Kingston Fossil Plant employees gave food boxes to 24 families of children at Dyllis Elementary School near Harriman.
    The staff at Bull Run Fossil Plant provided gifts for 32 children at Claxton Elementary School in Powell and delivered food baskets to 25 families.

  • TVA employees help out

    TVA employees are providing food, gifts and other donations to children and families in need across the TVA service area this holiday season.
    Kingston Fossil Plant employees gave food boxes to 24 families of children at Dyllis Elementary School near Harriman.
    The staff at Bull Run Fossil Plant provided gifts for 32 children at Claxton Elementary School in Powell and delivered food baskets to 25 families.

  • Requirement of liner indication of TVA failure

    Gone is the big cloud of steam over the Kingston Fossil Plant that had become a symbol of cleaner air over much of the Southeast.
    It has been replaced with the nastier, albeit less obvious, emissions from the plant’s twin stacks.
    All this is a result of TVA’s leaky gypsum containment pond.

  • IMPRESSIONS by Johnny Teglas

    Folks here at the office work hard to get information to you.
    They also know they’re more than welcome to share a lighter moment when we push past a deadline and put another issue to bed.
    We call it “decompression time.”
    It’s when we take a healthy breath and step back from our deadline-driven lives.
    It is in those moments that we remember we’re fellow sojourners along life’s highway.
    Banter ranges across many subjects and disciplines.

  • Gypsum-selling efforts still a no-go at Kingston Fossil Plant

    Ponds aren’t always the final resting place for gypsum produced at TVA’s coal-fired power plants.
    John Kammeyer, TVA’s vice president of coal combustion products, said the gypsum produced at the Cumberland Fossil Plant is sold and used to make wallboard.
    “Here at Kingston, it’s being pumped out to this big pond,” Kammeyer said.
    That was before the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation ordered TVA to stop using the gypsum pond.
    A leak was discovered in the pond on Dec. 15.

  • White Christmas to be followed by warmup

    Roane Countians got to revel in a white Christmas on Saturday — even if it was only for a while.
    Snow fell across the county.
    David Hotz, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Office in Morristown, said the amounts varied throughout East Tennessee.  
    “Roane County, I think, was more between like 1 to 2 inches,” he said. “I think maybe the southern part of Roane County picked up a little bit more than that. If you go down to Chattanooga, they had more like between 4 and 6 inches.”

  • Hopes of Harriman run with Channel 15

    Channel 15, Harriman’s new government access channel has the capabilities to put on quite a production.
    Bill Landry, known for his narration and other roles with “The Heartland Series,” said the station has the same level of equipment as some professional outfits.
    “This is as good equipment as (Knoxville’s) Channel 10 has; it just doesn’t have as much,” Landry said.