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Today's News

  • Community health fair coming Feb. 16

    The annual Luminary United Methodist Church free community health fair will be on Feb. 16 in the church at 3401 River Road, Ten Mile.

    A blood lab and several physicians and medical specialists will provide free screening services from 8 a.m. to noon.

    Call the church at 376-7040 to schedule a free bone density scan appointment from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

  • Lift Every Voice: Service to honor King’s spiritual legacy

    The community will gather this weekend to remember and honor the work of the Rev. Martin Luther King at a special service at Rockwood First Christian Church, Disciples of Christ.

    The 3 p.m. worship service on Jan. 18 will honor the spiritual legacy of King, the civil rights leader best known for his “I Have A Dream” speech who was shot and killed in Memphis in April 1968.

  • State NAACP head to speak at Freedom Fund Banquet

    Gloria J. Sweet-Love, Tennessee NAACP State Conference president, will be the keynote speaker during the Freedom Fund Banquet on Jan. 17.

    The annual dinner, an event of the Roane County NAACP in cooperation with Roane State Community College, will begin at 6 p.m. in the student lounge of Roane State’s main campus in Roane County.

    The young adult speaker will be Jennifer Hill.

    Tickets are $30 and are available by calling Roane County NAACP President Joe Eskridge at 385-8378 or 882-5545.

  • Tensions rise at assessor’s

    Charles Laxton doesn’t care for how property assessor David Morgan is doing his job.

    Laxton let him know it on Wednesday.

    Laxton could be heard slamming the door and giving Morgan a piece of his mind throughout the courthouse.

    As a result, he was escorted out by the sheriff’s office.

    Here’s how Morgan described the incident:

  • LET ’EM ROLL

    The need for cooperation between fire departments was made clear recently by two major Harriman fires — one massive, the other fatal.

    Many area fire departments rolled out to help with the Jan. 8 inferno that razed the downtown Miller & Brewer building, and then again at Monday’s Margrave Street fire that killed a 65-year-old woman.

    That kind of mutual aid between departments is common at larger, more complicated fires.

    A closer working relationship may soon emerge between Kingston and Harriman fire departments, however.

  • Meadows quits Plateau board

    After three months on the Roane County Commission, Darryl Meadows decided he doesn’t have time to continue serving on the Plateau Partnership Park Industrial Development Board.

    He resigned from the board last month.

    “I talked to (Roane County Executive) Ron (Woody) and said, ‘Hey, it may be best if I just step aside and let someone do it that has the time,’” Meadows said.

    Meadows, a former Rockwood city councilman, was elected to a District 1 commission seat last August. His four-year term began Sept. 1.

  • Downtown fire finally out, cleanup brings new problems

    The long-burning fire that destroyed the old Miller & Brewer building is out.

    “We actually just got the rest of the fire out yesterday,” said Harriman Fire Chief Brad Goss on Thursday.

    The fallen building smoldered for days after a fire gutted it on Jan. 8, and water could not reach the burning debris under the rubble.

    On Tuesday, Harriman City Council hired local company Ace Inc. to clear out the bricks so firefighters could extinguish the fire completely.

  • Commander speaks
  • Family remembers woman who died in fire

    Frances Ann Powell Snow’s family are mourning a willful but loving mother, grandmother and sister.

    “We love her very much and miss her,” said daughter B.J. Allison, of Snow, who died in a Harriman house fire Monday.

    “She was a wonderful mother,” added daughter Shannon Allison. “She was always there when she was needed.”

    The 65-year-old disabled woman was the only one at home when fire broke out at 505 Margrave St. Other family members were at work.

  • GUEST OPINION: Question begged — Just how Je Suis Charlie to be?

    By GENE POLICINSKI

    First Amendment Center

    After one week, a tough question already is being asked: Just how “Je Suis Charlie” (I am Charlie) should we be?

    At the outset, First Amendment advocates need to recognize the many layers of such a question — which originates not in reconsideration of recognition of those killed Jan. 7, but in the subsequent worldwide examination of the content of Charlie Hebdo magazine and other publications like it.