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Today's News

  • EPA bows to pressure, sets Knoxville coal ash hearing

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has done an about-face:
    It will now hold a hearing on proposed coal ash rules closer to Roane County, site of the Dec. 22, 2008, catastrophe that got the government talking about the need for tougher ash regulation.
    “EPA will hold a final hearing in Knoxville, Tenn., the week of Oct. 25,” the agency said in an e-mail.
    Officials said they were still  making arrangements on the exact date and place.

  • Harriman gets perfect score from state on waterworks

    Harriman Utility Board got a perfect score — a 100 — on its sanitary survey of the utility’s waterworks.
    The Tennessee Division of Water Supply conducted the survey July 21.
    While plants do receive the high score, its a rarity, according to Harriman Utility Board officials.
    “I can’t tell you how proud I am of our water plant operators and our water crew,” HUB Manager Chuck Flora said.
    “You don’t get those 100s by yourself,” said Frankie Davis, water and gas superintendent.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: Gold rush: Heading into the hills to find it

    If any wildflower deserves a fan club, it is solidago. And I would fight like a dog to be the president of it.
    I thought as much as I took the winding roads up Roan Mountain over the long weekend.
    My mother and I had abandoned our plans to swim at Indian Boundary Lake (too chilly that day), and instead made the drive to upper East Tennessee.
    We stopped at the Gray Fossil Site near Johnson City, took the tour and marveled over the many magnificent prehistoric animals that once walked the earth there.

  • Shots fired at Midway school

    Someone shot up the front of Midway High School Wednesday night.
    Roane County Sheriff Jack Stockton said no one was inside the school when the shooting occurred.
    It was reported to E-911 at 11:25 p.m.
    “The officers arrived and found more than 20 rounds shot through the front of the building, the door facing and some internal damage was done to the block walls inside the offices and inside the school,” Stockton said.
    The sheriff said Thursday morning that his officers were still trying to identify possible suspects.  

  • Nails a hazard on Barnard Narrows Road

    The Roane County Highway Department responded to Barnard Narrows Road on Wednesday after being notified nails were on the road.
    “Our kids travel this road on buses,” resident Juanita Johnson said. “Our mail man comes through here, and we just don’t need this. We don’t need nothing that’s going to endanger any of us.”
    County Road Superintendent Tom Hamby said he was aware of the situation, but had yet to be briefed by the employee who responded to pick up the nails.

  • Flying field feud finally settled

    Woo!
    That was the exclamation heard from Harriman Councilman Chase Tedder, who was relieved that the issue of renewal of a lease of city industrial property finally had been dealt with.
    Harriman City Council approved the renewal of a lease for the airstrip area used by the Tennessee Eagles Radio Control Club on Tuesday.
    “See you in three years, men. Hopefully we’ll have it developed,” Tedder said.

  • A View From Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen

    Gentle reader, our nation is troubled, it is divided, it seems to have lost its way, but there are solutions that should alleviate some of this national distress, however we must recognize with some degree of accuracy what the problems are, before we can hope to resolve them.
    Unfortunately, in the present atmosphere, when we are beset by a tribe of screamers, and scammers, disciples of the faith of political correctness, and supposed wise men besotted with ignorance, arrogance, and self delusion, it is indeed difficult to spy the trees for the surrounding forest.

  • Alexander helps get EPA hearings in Knoxville

    It took some arm-twisting, but finally, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is scheduling a hearing on proposed changes in the classification of coal ash in the area.
    The Knoxville hearing, announced by U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander Wednesday, is reasonably close to the site of the 2008 ash spill at TVA’s Kingston Fossil Plant — one of the nation’s biggest environmental disasters. Alexander, who did much of the arm-twisting, had asked for a hearing in Kingston.

  • St. Andrew's plans Blessing of Animals

    St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Harriman will join other churches across the country and around the world on Oct. 9 in the Blessing of the Animals custom.
    The event that will be open to the public. The line of pets — everything from dogs and cats to hamsters and horses — will begin forming at 2 p.m. at the church at 190 Circle Drive.
    The Rector of St. Andrew’s, the Rev. Joseph Pinner, will preside.

  • TVA completes construction of spring-filled water line for Kingston

    Kingston and TVA officials recently celebrated the official dedication of a new spring-fed water line that will provide a plentiful supply of clean water to Kingston residents.
    The original gravity water line was destroyed during the 2008 ash spill at TVA’s Kingston Fossill Plant. At the request of Kingston Mayor Troy Beets, TVA officials agreed to a complete replacement of the damaged water line.