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Today's News

  • Kingston runs streak to 18

    The Harriman Blue Devils will one day put an end to Kingston's winning streak in football, but that day will have to wait at least one more year as the Yellow Jackets travelled to Harriman Friday night and defeated the Blue Devils, 33-15, in a packed house at Wallace Black Field.

  • OR manager to have Lunch With the League Sept. 7

    Newly selected Oak Ridge City Manager Mark Watson will be the guest speaker during the next Oak Ridge League of Women Voters’ Lunch With the League.
    The series starts at 11:45 a.m. Sept. 7 in Oak Ridge Unitarian Universalist Church at 1500 Oak Ridge Turnpike.
    Lunch is available on a first-come, first-served basis at a cost of $6.
    The program begins at noon.
    Watson, who has said his management style is one of “openness and communication, has had a 30-year career in local government. He was city manager in Yuma, Ariz., from 2005-10.

  • Harriman getting ready for 'Haunting'

    Get set for fun, thrills and chills in a historically accurate, spirit-filled adventure through the streets of Harriman.
    The annual Hauntings of Historic Harriman will begin at 8 p.m. Oct. 8-9 from the Temperance Building in downtown Harriman.
    “The area is home to beautiful Victorian homes and buildings built over a century ago,” said Becky McClurkan, one of the event organizers.
    “Given the long history of this area, it should come as no surprise that ghosts and spirits are known all too well to the people living there.”

  • MILITARY MATTERS: Rachel L. Sanders

    U.S. Army Reserve Pfc. Rachel L. Sanders recently graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
    She is the daughter of Barbara Sanders of Kingston.
    Her grandmother is Lois Bell of Egg Harbor City, N.J.
    During the nine weeks of training, Sanders studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values and physical fitness.

  • Eagles raising funds to help Hunter King's dog mission

    Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie 3429, Midtown, is devoted to helping Hunter King and his family.
    The organization recently wrapped up a “Luau Fundraiser,” and the “Helping Hunter Party in the Park” is planned from 5 to 8 p.m. Sept. 11 at Roane County Park.
    A silent auction, bake sale and children’s games are planned.
    Hunter suffers from autism, and his family is working with Wilderwood Service Dogs in Maryville to purchase a service dog trained to assist children in Hunter’s situation.

  • DAR, veterans lend a helping hand
  • SLAMMED

    “It was a nightmare.”
    That’s what witness Tiffany Coy — the only stylist who was not injured in a Kingston beauty shop that was rammed by a van Tuesday — said about the accident.
    But she also said things could have been much worse.
    Coy was in a back room of Classic Styles on Race Street when Tuesday’s horrific accident happened.
    Ten people were injured — six of them to the extent they had to be transported out by medical helicopters.
    Two days after the accident, Coy was still sorting things out.

  • County employee raises? Hard to say just yet

    Roane County employees may have to wait until the fall to find out if they will get a raise.
    In June, the budget committee instructed budget director Alva Moore to prepare figures in case they decided to add a 1-percent raise for employees to the proposed 2010-11 fiscal budget.
    Moore said a 1-percent raise would cost taxpayers about $103,000.
    The budget still hasn’t been adopted, and the current budget committee terms expire on Aug. 31.

  • Republican Party holding grand opening

    The Roane County Republican Party is holding a grand opening on Sept. 11 of its new headquarters.
    The building is at 901 E. Race St. in Kingston, just a couple of buildings west of the Shell station on Morrison Hill.

  • Feds find no problem with soil dredged from Clinch River

    Nothing to worry about. That was the U.S. Department of Energy’s conclusion about Clinch River soil in a local resident’s yard.
    “It was really what we expected,” DOE spokesman Mike Koentop said of the government’s findings.
    Scott Boyes wanted the soil removed from the front yard at his Walton Road home because it came from the Clinch River.
    Koentop said the river has DOE contaminants from legacy operations years and years ago.
    When contacted by Boyes, DOE officials agreed to go to his home and take samples of the soil.