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Today's News

  • Ms. Lillie still serving after 50 years

    She’s a beloved part of Kingston Food City’s staff.

    Ninety-year-old Lillie Herrell still bags groceries at the large regional grocery chain, and she’s been part of the business for decades.

    “It was the White Store when I started,” said Lillie Herrell.

    Herrell said she started working for the grocery chain back in 1963.

    She said the White Store used to be located where the Roane County Jail is today. The grocery chain later became Food City and eventually moved to Ladd Landing where it now sits.

  • Dream season ends for Lady Tigers in region tourney

     

    Rockwood's dream season came to a disappointing end Tuesday evening as the Lady Tigers were knocked off by Christian Academy of Knoxville (CAK), 9-1, in the Region 2 A/AA semifinals at Mike "Brillo" Miller Sports Complex.

  • Roane teams pick up wins in Eble tourney

     

    The 2014 Hollis Eble Tournament continued Tuesday at Oakdale School with five more games, including three involving Roane County teams.

  • The Garden Gate: This berry can weigh hundreds of pounds

    Editor’s note: As Ellen Probert Williams continues her respite, we share one of her classic columns, first published on Oct. 24, 2012.

    Using pumpkins as jack-o’-lanterns for Halloween is an American idea — an adaption of the medieval custom of making lanterns out of hollowed-out turnips.

    Those in medieval England, Scotland and Ireland believed elves, ghosts and fairies haunted the Earth. It was customary to build huge bonfires to ward them off.

  • Newspaper digitization to be lecture focus

    Historical newspaper records once available only through long hours of research can now

    be accessed within seconds.

    In a lecture on Oct. 29, project coordinator Louisa Trott will talk about the scope of The Tennessee Digitization Project, its value to researchers and how it can be accessed.

    Trott will also give examples of the many types of information to be found in newspapers from the period.

    The lecture, free and open to the public, will begin at noon in the East Tennessee History Center at 601 S. Gay St., Knoxville.

  • Heritage tourism expert to speak at session to study future of OR museum

    Lee Curtis, a recognized expert on heritage tourism, will be the guest speaker during a community meeting to gather input on the future of American Museum of Science and Energy operations.

    The city of Oak Ridge and the museum Foundation invited Curtis, director of program development and legislative liaison for the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development, to be the featured speaker in the fourth community public meeting.

    The meeting will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 23 in the museum at 300 S. Tulane Ave., Oak Ridge.

  • Young-Leslie

    Mr. and Mrs. Ronny Young of Smithville announce the forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Alyssa Anne Young, to Daniel Lee Leslie.

    He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Leslie of Kingston.

    The ceremony will be at 4 p.m. Oct. 25 in Elizabeth Chapel Baptist Church, Smithville.

    The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Violet Pack and the late John W. Pack, and James Young and the late Marie Young, all of Smithville.

  • On vacation with the Roane County News ... in New York City!

    The Roane County News took a bite out of the Big Apple when it accompanied Mackenzie Leach on a fall break trip to New York City.

    The pair pause for a photo in Central Park on their big site-seeing tour.

    Planning a vacation? Take your Roane County News along and pose with it to be included in an upcoming issue.

    Be sure to tell us where you — and the News — traveled for a break and photo.

    You may drop off photos at the newspaper office at 204 Franklin St., Kingston, or email to newsroom@roanecounty.com.

    Happy travels!

  • Kingston’s Dye tops in watermelon-carving contest

    Kingston’s Nanthawan Dye was recently awarded second place in the 2014 Watermelon Carving Contest.

    Dye’s entry, which took honors in the “Most Elegant” category, was among the elegantly etched and creatively carved watermelons from across the globe submitted for the contest, sponsored by the National Watermelon Promotion Board.

    “We were wowed by the nearly 100 contest submissions this year — the most we’ve ever received,” said Stephanie Barlow, National Watermelon Promotion Board director of PR and social media.

  • Fall Happenings 2014

    Festivals
    • The second annual Senior Street Fair, a partnership between Rockwood Housing Authority and Mid-East Community Action Agency, will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 24 on West Rockwood Street, Rockwood, in front of Martin Manor Apartments. Music, an Elvis impersonator, a chili and cornbread competition for seniors, vendors, marshmallow roast, cake walks and other activities are planned. A warming center will be inside Martin Manor for those needing to get in from the cold.