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Today's News

  • Teacher charged with DUI on New Year’s Eve

    A teacher employed with Roane County Schools was arrested on New Year’s Eve.

    Michael P. Neal is charged with driving under the influence, leaving the scene of an accident and immediate notice of an accident.

    According to reports, Neal was driving a Lincoln MKX when he was involved in a property damage crash on Hobson Road near Kingston.

  • MESSY MONDAY

     

     

  • Cooking fire damages Swan Pond home

    A family of six children and two adults are displaced after a house fire that started in the kitchen of the 2419 Swan Pond home this weekend.

    Nobody was injured, and the family of Rhyanna Frazier was able to find a place to stay for the moment.

    “They went with family,” said Harriman Capt. Matt Hickey.

    The fire department narrative said smoke was visible from the front door and eaves when fire fighters arrived.

    Firefighter Travis May and Lt. John Stringfield made entry through an unlocked front door.

  • No one hurt when SUV rolled into Clinch

    On Monday morning, Kingston Fire Department, with assistance from Roane County Rescue Squad, were called to Ladd Landing to rescue a submerged Ford Escape.

    The vehicle had rolled down the boat ramp and into the frigid water around 6:45 p.m. Sunday.

    Mary Tuck of Oliver Springs told police that she and her husband Mickey were in the vehicle, and both got out at the same time, and the Escape started rolling down the ramp.

  • Trial delayed for mom accused of starving toddler

    Another delay has occurred in the case of the parents accused of starving their 2-year-old son to death.

    Matthew and Amanda Dotson are being tried separately on first-degree murder and aggravated child abuse charges.

    Amanda Dotson’s trial that was scheduled to start on Jan. 16 was recently postponed.

    “Another delay is correct, and it’s because of the DNA testing that the defense is having done,” Assistant District Attorney General Bob Edwards said.

  • It’s Girl Scout Cookie time

    The Girl Scout Council of the Southern Appalachians is now in the next century of a beloved fundraising tradition, with Girl Scouts now taking orders for the 2018 campaign.

    The Girl Scout Cookie Program not only teaches girls essential entrepreneurial skills but also powers amazing experiences for them across the United States.

  • No more chemo

    Addie Moore never let her battle with acute lymphocytic leukemia keep her down and, if possible, she’s even more exuberant because she’s won the war on the disease.

    The Kingston Elementary first grader and her family were joined by friends and loved ones to celebrate “no mo chemo” with the release of 848 balloons at Fort Southwest Point.

    “That was how long she was in treatment,” said Gena Moore, Addie’s grandmother or “Mimi.”

  • Mess lands woman in jail

    On Dec. 7, Chancellor Frank V. Williams III gave Helen Hayes until Jan. 4 to remove half of the debris off her property. The mess hadn’t changed by that morning, according to Roane County officials.

    “Has there been any noticeable difference since we were in court on Dec. 7?” County Attorney Greg Leffew asked Codes Enforcement Official Glen Cofer.

    “No sir,” Cofer responded. “Not that I can tell.”

  • Roads a go, surveys and work at standstill

    The roads the Roane County Commission voted to accept in Pioneer Village Subdivision last August still aren’t being maintained by the county.

    Officials said a survey must be completed before that can happen, but there is a question about who will pay for it.

    Road Superintendent Dennis Ferguson didn’t ask the Commission to take over the roads, so he said he’s not paying for the survey out of his department’s budget.

    “They’ll (the Commission) be the ones that’s doing it if they do it,” Ferguson said.

  • Funds allow Habitat to repair homes for needy

    Roane County Habitat for Humanity is using a generous donation to fund a variety of home repair projects for Roane County residents in need.

    Best known for building small, low-cost homes, Habitat for Humanity is now helping low-income families in Roane County with needed repairs to their homes that they cannot afford themselves.

    The program repairs or replaces roofs, windows, heating and air conditioning units, water heaters, damaged kitchens and bathrooms and potentially other critical repairs.