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Today's News

  • Man beaten with tree clippers

    A Harriman man was taken to University of Tennessee Medical Center earlier this month with a fractured skull he suffered in an alleged assault.

    Kingston police charged Joshua Morgan, 23, with aggravated assault and aggravated burglary in the incident. Morgan allegedly used “a pair of long-handled tree clippers” to beat Matthew Honeycutt.

    The incident happened at 814 S. Kentucky St. in Kingston.

    Honeycutt was found laying in the front yard bleeding when police arrived.

  • Little left to be done after 2008 ash spill

    Cleanup of one of the worst environmental disasters in the country has ever seen continues to wind down in Swan Pond.

    Craig Zeller, remedial project manager for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, said an inspection was conducted at the TVA ash spill site on Jan. 29. The final inspection is expected to occur this spring.

    “We have a few loose ends,” Zeller said.

  • Another huge cleanup in Roane County

    The cleanup of TVA’s massive coal ash spill is winding down near Kingston this year, but another massive effort is gearing up in the northeast corner of Roane County.

    Federal officials are down to the last cell in a Bear Creek Road landfill set aside for the demolition of contaminated K-25 buildings on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  • Another record for TVA production

    Arctic temperatures that averaged in single digits across much of the Tennessee Valley on Thursday, Feb. 19, resulted in record electricity demand of 694 gigawatt-hours for the 24-hour period.

    That’s the most energy ever required over a one-day period during February in Tennessee Valley Authority history and the third most overall for a 24-hour period.

    The all-time one-day record occurred last year when demand reached 703 gigawatt-hours on Jan. 7.

  • Family makes due while waiting for electricity

    Last week was an adventure in pioneering for Jonathan and Leann Isham and their brood.

    The family of six — including twin toddlers Ella and Anna — were making due Thursday in their Edwards Lane home while waiting for the electricity to be restored.

    “You can see your breath in any other room,” said Leann, huddled up on a couch with elder children Tristan and Olivia.

    “I have to curl up in a ball,” quipped Tristan.

  • Pill ring leader says he’s dying of cancer

    John Wesley Goss, the mastermind behind an elaborate Roane County pill ring, could be released before sentencing.

    According to his attorney, Goss is suffering from stage 4 cancer and has three months to live.

    “In view of the exceptional circumstances in this case, the court has the authority to release Mr. Goss pending sentencing,” federal defender Paula R. Voss said in a motion for release.

    Voss included a letter from Goss’ doctor with her motion.

  • DEEP FREEZE TURNS FATAL

    Tony Dean Stanley, a 44-year-old Roane County man, died of hypothermia last week.

    “He was found yesterday,” Roane County Medical Examiner Dr. Thomas Boduch said late Thursday afternoon.

    “We can’t be sure exactly when the death occurred, but sometime between Sunday (Feb. 15) and yesterday (Feb. 18).”

    Boduch said Stanley was last seen alive on Sunday, Feb. 15.

    He lived in the Eagle Furnace area south of Rockwood.

  • Harriman Happenings: March 2

    Get-well wishes are extended to Eugene Collier, who is in a hospital in Knoxville. May you soon be healed and back home to your family.

    At the time of this writing, Curtis Ray is a patient in Parkwest Medical Center in Knoxville.

    We wish him a speedy recovery.

    A well known Christian lady of Harriman by the name of Bonnie Coleman was called to her heavenly home Sunday, Feb. 22, at her home with her son and family by her side.

  • Girl Scout cookies are here!

    Neither rain nor snow, nor sleet can stop the Girl Scouts.

    Despite weeks of winter weather, Girl Scout cookies are here — and so is a holiday for cookie lovers.

    More than 1.3 million boxes of cookies have arrived in the Girl Scout Council of the Southern Appalachians area.

    Roane County girls are now delivering their cargo, and booth sales in front of area businesses will continue through March 22.

  • Make a clean path for the mailman

    Winter storms and along with them the cold, snow and icy conditions can make delivery of your mail very challenging for letter carriers and the post office.

    Postal patrons in Roane County can support their letter carriers and post office in providing safe and timely delivery of your mail.

    “We will do our best to make delivery to all addresses,” said U.S. Postal Service spokesman David Walton.

    “At the same time, we must insure the safety of our carriers along their routes,” he added.