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Today's News

  • Fleischmann will be no-show

    The Roane County Tea Party planned to have U.S. Congressman Chuck Fleischmann and rival Weston Wamp appear at a debate forum in Kingston on Thursday.

    Now Fleischmann will not attend.  

    “Congress is in session during that time, so he will not be there,” Fleischmann spokesman Jordan Powell said Sunday.

    The Tea Party sent out a press release on July 10 that said, “Both candidates have agreed to attend.”

  • Schools asking for 9-cent tax hike

    The Roane County Board of Education approved a $64.8 million budget on Thursday that requests a 9-cent increase in the property tax rate.

    “It’s certainly not what we need, but it will keep us going for two or three years,” Director of Schools Gary Aytes said. “By that time, we hope the economy will recover and the state will come through with some more funding.”

    The budget passed by an 8-2 vote. Mike “Brillo” Miller and Danny Wright were the two who voted no.

  • ‘God’ motto forum fodder

    Candidates running for District 1 County Commission and Board of Education got a chance to discuss their platforms and other issues during a forum on Thursday.

    The forum was hosted by Rockwood 2000 at city hall.

    Ron Berry, Barry Cofer, Roberta Dennis, Benny East, Wade McCullough, Darryl Meadows, William Bud Strader and Billy Wright are vying for District 1’s three commission seats.

    East and Strader didn’t participate in the forum.

  • New wheels now on patrol in Rockwood
  • Harriman pondering false-alarm policy

    Harriman may be joining Rockwood in establishing a policy for excessive false alarms at area businesses.

    “We have had a lot of trouble with false alarms going off,” said Assistant Fire Chief Brad Daniels.

    It’s not uncommon for the Harriman Fire Department to respond to a call at 2 or 3 a.m. — and the alarm is again going off even before firefighters return to the firehall, Daniels said.

    “They don’t do anything with the alarm,” he added. “They don’t get anyone to work on them.”

  • Chamber forum preceding the start of early voting

    Roane County Chamber of Commerce welcomes the public to attend a candidate forum on July 15 in Roane State Community College’s O’Brien Theatre at 276 Patton Lane in Roane County.

    The doors will open at 5:30 p.m.

    Designed to give each candidate the opportunity to express his view of how government should relate to the local business community, the forum will consist of question-and-answer sessions grouped by city and office.

  • Travis: I know Tennessee is on the right path

    Ron Travis is eager for a second term to prove he deserved to replace Jim Cobb.

    The two Republicans vied for the District 31 Tennessee State Representative spot in 2012, with Travis narrowly beating Cobb.

    “I know Tennessee is on the right path,” Travis said. “I think we got a good team in Nashville right now. I think you’re going to see Tennessee grow and prosper for my children and my grandchildren.

    “That is what matters for me, what I can leave for my grandchildren.”

  • Cobb: Cutting red tape ­— that is my specialty

    Former state representative Jim Cobb wants to turn the tables on adversary Ron Travis, who ousted Cobb from his seat in 2012.

    The pair, who faced off in that race two years ago, are again up for a rematch in the Republican primary for Tennessee House of Representatives for the 31st District, which includes part of Rockwood and West Roane County.

  • Looseleaf Laureate: Kingston woman quietly shares garden’s bounty

    If you travel on Third Street near the Roane County Courthouse in Kingston, chances are you know Pat Ward.

    You just may not know you know her.

    Ward lives in a modest house that might escape your notice; it’s her garden that draws your attention.

    Sunflowers and and corn rise tall.

    Billowing black-eyed Susans nod at squash and beans. Elegant resurrection lilies stand in a group on the side of the house, while, in front, zinnias in primary colors sway gregariously at passing cars.

  • Dental check-up can make you all smiles for school

    While the term “back-to-school” brings to mind busy schedules and the purchase of new backpacks, lunchboxes, clothing and a laundry list of supplies, a dental check-up is an integral part of a child’s overall health and wellbeing.

    Untreated dental disease can interfere with learning, speech and eating, leading to poor nutrition and problems in the classroom.

    One-third of children ages 6-8 have untreated cavities in permanent teeth. Tooth decay, which can result in cavities, pain and infection, has become the most common childhood disease.