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Today's News

  • City hopes surplus will pay for more paving

    Harriman is presently under budget on its paving projects, and city officials hope the money saved will enable them to resurface even more streets.

    City Manager Kevin Helms is optimistic the initial list of streets can be completed below officials’ estimates, which were higher than what was actually budgeted.

    If all pans out, even more paving can be completed.

    “We felt pretty confident we had estimated some quantities high, so we felt our actual expenses would be less,” said Helms.

  • Very Blessed Seniors

    In 1936, Caney Ford Baptist Church in Midtown held its first-ever vacation Bible school.

    In attendance that year were Don Alford, Sanny Bowman and Jack Bowman.

    A lot has changed in 80 years, but one thing is still the same: the trio is still attending VBS at the church they love.

    Sanny Bowman and Alford are both 85 years old, while Jack Bowman is 83.

    Other than serving their country, they have never missed a VBS.

  • ‘Joy is gone’ with new HHA rules

    Harriman Housing Authority resident Mary Louise Trout dedicates many hours to growing beautiful plants and trees in her yard.

    Proposed changes to the Authority’s rules might bring an end to her labor of love.

    “I really hate to see my yard go because it is my pride and joy, but because of all this stuff going on I’m afraid my joy is gone,” she said.

    The proposed changes include limits on items in the yard, including a limit to two flower pots.

  • Balanced county budget to address needs of sheriff

    Despite some challenges, the Roane County Commission’s budget committee plans to present a spending plan for the 2016-17 fiscal year that doesn’t seek an increase in the property tax rate.

    “I think we are addressing some real needs at the sheriff’s department and jail, along with maintaining the budgets in the other departments with no tax increase,” Commissioner/Budget Committee Member Darryl Meadows said.

  • Judge denies motion to delay Smoot trial

    Nearly five years have passed since Brooke Nicole Morris was found dead.

    Her accused killer has yet to face a jury, but that could change this summer.

    On Tuesday Criminal Court Judge Jeff Wicks denied a motion to postpone Shawn Smoot’s scheduled July 25 trial at the Roane County Courthouse.

    “The court is not inclined to continue this matter any further,” Wicks said.

    Smoot’s defense attorney, Bob Jolley of Knoxville, filed a motion for a continuance on Friday. Jolley is Smoot’s fifth court-appointed attorney.

  • 25 apply to fill Rockwood High principal post

    Rockwood High School isn’t the only place where a new face will be occupying the principal’s office this upcoming school year.

    Roane County Schools also has principal openings at Ridge View Elementary School in Rockwood and Dyllis Springs Elementary School near Oliver Springs.

    Alan Reed retired as principal at Rockwood High this year.

    Director of Schools Gary Aytes said Dyllis Springs principal David Stevens also retired and Ridge View principal Robin Smith resigned.

    Interviews for the open positions are under way this week.

  • ‘Big Hero 6’ voted to be shown at Cobbler Festival

    The votes are in — online voters have cast their ballots and chosen “Big Hero 6” to be shown as the sundown outdoor movie at the inaugural Harriman Fruit Cobbler Festival.

    The festival will be from 5 to 10 p.m. July 23 at David Webb Riverfront Park, Harriman.

    Activities at the festival also include the fruit cobbler competition and family activities.

    Visit www.cityofharriman.net or the city’s Facebook page for details.

  • GLIMPSES: 9/11 aftershocks and Election ’16

    By Mark Banker

    Author’s note: The following three premises are essential to this column: 1) None of us see the past or present with absolute clarity; 2) Each of us has the capacity for glimpses of informed insight that draw from and reflect our personal values; and 3) Cordial, forthright exchange of those insights enhances our mutual well being.

    When our great-grandchildren attempt to make sense of our lives in the 21st century’s first two decades, they will surely point to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and their wide-ranging aftershocks.

  • From the STATE SENATE: Roane benefits from state’s new budget

    By Ken Yager

    On July 1, Tennessee’s new 2016-17 budget will become effective, prompting major new improvements in a number of important areas of state government.

    In anticipation of its implementation, I want to tell you about how Tennesseans will be impacted by the appropriations adopted and how it affects Roane County specifically.

  • Kingston Library hosts Olympic Day

    Kingston Public Library children’s librarian Barbara Thorbjornsen wants to make reading fun for area kids this summer. She showed that Wednesday as the library hosted a special Olympic style event at Southwest Point.

    “It’s part of our summer reading program,”  Thorbjornsen said. “The theme this year is sports so I thought I’d do an Olympic Day with the kids.”

    “We’ll have a different program every Wednesday in June at 1 p.m. The next two weeks we will be doing face painting and balloon animals.”