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Today's News

  • Dyllis Springs honor roll: Second nine weeks 2014-15

    Dyllis Springs Elementary School applauds students who earned placement on its honor rolls and other achievements for the second nine weeks’ grading period.

    They are:

  • Austin Peay State University dean's list: fall 2014

    Shelly Starkey and Brandi Walls, both of Kingston, are among the Austin Peay State University students who earned placement on the dean’s list for fall semester.

    Students on the dean’s list have a semester grade-point average of 3.5 or greater.

    Austin Peay is in Clarksville.

  • Tusculum College graduates: fall 2014

    Two Tusculum College students from Roane County were among the school’s 233 recent graduates.

    Charles M. Snow Jr. of Oliver Springs earned a Master of Business Administration degree.

    Margaret L. Woods of Kingston earned a bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies, elementary K-6.

    Tusculum College is in Greeneville.

  • Volunteer State Community College dean's list: fall 2014

    Chasity Lively of Harriman has been named to Volunteer State Community College’s dean’s list for fall semester.

    Students on the dean’s list have completed a minimum of 12 hours with at least a 3.75 grade-point average during the awarding term.

    Volunteer State is in Gallatin.

  • University of the Cumberlands dean's list: fall 2014

    Kellie Ball of Harriman is among the students named to the University of the Cumberlands dean’s list for fall semester.

    To be eligible, students must have achieved a grade of “A” in convocation while maintaining a minimum cumulative scholastic standing of 3.50.

    University of the Cumberlands is in Williamsburg, Ky.

  • Henry leading initiative for Appalachian children

    Tennessee Department of Children’s Services Commissioner Jim Henry will chair a multi-state initiative designed to find solutions to help children and families throughout the Southern Appalachians.

    The Appalachian Child Welfare Leaders’ Roundtable, which is supported by Casey Family Programs, includes cabinet officials from Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia.

  • Free family concert Sunday

    The Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra will present “Peter and the Wolf” and Vivaldi’s “Spring” in a free family concert at 3 p.m. Jan. 25 in the Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge.

    Children are welcome to go early for paper-puppet making and instrument making beginning at 2 p.m. in the museum at 461 W. Outer Drive.

    The museum is offering free admission from 1 to 5 p.m. Jan. 25 to support the concert.

    The concert is funded through the Tennessee Arts Commission and National Endowment for the Arts.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET:

    Before we begin today’s contribution, we must do a bit of “housekeeping.” Regular readers were no doubt astonished when reading last week’s column to have come to the final paragraph and discovered that it had nothing whatsoever to do with the preceding topic, i. e. the Denny family and their building.

  • Dumping incident may draw charges

    Kingston Police Chief Jim Washam said his department may bring criminal charges against the people responsible for dumping gray sludge that ended up in Watts Bar Lake.

    “The one we found closest to covering what has happened is aggravated criminal littering,” he said.

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation is working with local officials as they look into what happened. No one had been charged as of press time Thursday.

  • NAACP speaker offers involvement tips

    Rockwood native Jennifer Hill said she knew immediately what she would talk about when Roane County NAACP President Joe Eskridge asked her to speak at the organization’s Jan. 17 Freedom Fund Banquet.

    “Activism through social media,” she said.

    Hill was one of two people to give an address at the event, which was held at Roane State Community College. The other was Gloria Jean Sweet-Love, a native of Fayette County and president of the Tennessee NAACP Conference. The theme of her speech was living for a cause greater than yourself.