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Today's News

  • National title game not a whiff for league

    Roane County Park saw a sports milestone this past weekend. The first national champion of National Wiffle Ball was crowned.

    The Warner Robbins, Georgia Village Idiots edged the Briscoe, Texas Master Batters, 1-0, to take the crown.

    The championship game was the culmination of a weekend of waffle ball played from teams from Tennessee, Georgia, Texas, Kentucky, and West Virginia.

    Saturday saw more than 100 spectators turn out to watch the teams participate in pool play and a home run derby.

  • Mother Nature too much for the Devils

    Mother Nature has been a foe for Roane County football this year.

    A week and a half ago, stormy weather caused scrimmages to be postponed and cancelled. The same things happened again last Friday as a number of pre-season matchups were at the mercy of the elements.

    The Harriman Blue Devils hosted the King’s Academy Lions with the skies heavy with dark, foreboding clouds.

    The teams’ coaches decided to start the scrimmage early in anticipation of the bad weather.

  • Tigers grrreat against Scott

    The Rockwood Tigers put together a solid performance in Huntsville Friday evening, as John Webb’s squad scored three touchdowns without yielding any in a scrimmage with Scott High.

    “I thought we did a lot of good things, but we still have a lot to work on,” Webb said. “One thing about it is that we had great effort. We messed up a few assignments, but overall we got something to work with. If these kids keep playing hard, they’re going to get better day in and day out.”

  • GLIMPSES: Conflict again a complication

    By Mark Banker

    During World War II, Winston Churchill reportedly observed: “Americans will always do the right thing – after exhausting all the alternatives.”

    Whether the British statesmen uttered those exact words is debatable. But we might all hope that this realistic appraisal will someday be appropriate for our own present chapter in history.

  • LAST DAYS OF FREEDOM
  • WEAR THIS, NOT THAT

    A revised dress code will be in place when students start the 2017-18 school year today – Wednesday.

    “I think people won’t even notice,” Roane County Board of Education Member Larry Brackett said about the changes.

    The board passed the revision in June. The old policy included a paragraph that said principals could take action against a student, volunteer or employee when “in the opinion of” school administration there was a violation of the dress code.

    The “in the opinion of” is no longer in the policy.

  • Police hurt on the job

    Two lawmen with separate municipal police departments have been injured in recent days while working roadway incidents.

    Both men are sergeants with their respective departments.

    Oliver Springs Police Sgt. Charlie Graham was struck while working a wreck on Thursday. Three days later, Kingston Sgt. Jerry Singleton had his left knee fractured when a vehicle fled the scene.

  • Sewer settlement a plus for Rockwood

    Rockwood Water, Sewer and Natural Gas officials have been waiting to see the remainder of a Front Avenue sewer line project completed after a disagreement between the contractor and engineers arose.

    The project stalled after the elevation of the newly installed sewer did not align with the elevation of the existing sewer to which the new line was to connect, and the parties responsible for the project couldn’t agree who should pay for the mistake.

  • Aim for the sky at OS festival

    Nestled at the foot of Windrock Mountain, the sleepy little town of Oliver Springs has the distinction of being located in part of three counties.

    Often feeling they struggle to be recognized, the town’s Historical Society has been restoring a 1928 garage to house a museum and event center.

    Like “OZ,” Roane County’s “OS” has its own movie, “October Sky.”

  • MTSU expert to meet with heritage group in Oak Ridge

    Lydia Simpson, programs manager for Middle Tennessee State University’s Center for Historic Preservation, will speak during the next meeting of the Oak Ridge Heritage and Preservation Association.

    The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Aug. 10 in Midtown Community Center at 102 Robertsville Road, Oak Ridge.

    Heritage and science tourism are extremely important for Oak Ridge. In her job, Simpson manages the department’s public programming and outreach, with particular involvement with CHP digital platform initiatives.