.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • GUEST OPINION: Freedom to report requires another freedom

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    Freedom to report the news requires the freedom to gather it.

    In the months ahead, that basic concept — so central to the First Amendment’s protection of a free press — will also be at the heart of the ongoing debate over how far government officials may go in pursuit of those responsible for “leaking” classified information to journalists.

  • Noe-Phillips

    Don and Paula Noe of Oliver Springs announce the forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Christian Noe, to Jacob Phillips.

    He is the son of Jon and Renee Phillips of Ten Mile.

    The ceremony will be at 3 p.m. June 8 in Luminary United Methodist Church, Ten Mile. A reception will follow in the church’s reception hall.

    Invitations will be sent, but all relatives and friends of the couple are invited to attend.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of May 29

    25 Years Ago
    Kingston’s Morrison Hill Christian Church welcomed Dennis Mullen as its new pastor. A 1987 graduate of Johnson Bible College in Knoxville, he is a native of Glenmont, Ohio.

    10 Years Ago
    Roane County businessman Steve Kirkham was honored by the Harriman Economic Advisory Team for his contributions to the community. Kirkham, owner of area Rocky Top Markets, was cited as a member of Hooray for Harriman and the Roane County Industrial Development Board.

    Five Years Ago

  • The Garden Gate: It’s easy to go bananas with such a variety of available fruit

    Bananas, as a food, are far older than recorded history. Their earliest home is believed to be the tropical regions of South Asia.

    The armies of Alexander the Great found bananas rowing abundantly in the valley of the Indus in 327 B.C. He learned that dried roots could be carried long distances and would then grown anywhere that the climate was suitable.

  • County wants bigger slice of pie

    Roane County Schools isn’t the only entity in county government facing a budget shortfall. The budget committee is trying to make up a $500,000 shortfall in the county’s general fund. 
    “You have to cut or get more revenue,” Roane County Executive Ron Woody said.

  • City manager details tweaked

    The devil is in the details, but Kingston City Council crafted a first-draft contract for their intended new city manager.
    After a selection process that began with 39 applicants to fill the position of retiring City Manager Jim Pinkerton, Kingston officials scheduled a round of interviews for four finalists earlier this month.
    Two dropped out, seeking other positions.

  • Rarity developer charges dismissed

    The U.S. Attorney’s Office filed a motion in federal court last week to dismiss a  28-count indictment against developer Michael L. Ross.
    “As grounds therefore the United States would advise the court that new exculpatory evidence has been developed and provided by the defense that undermines the accuracy of the current indictment in this case,” the motion said.

  • CORRECTION

    The story Lane Changes in the May 24 edition has some incorrect dates. Instead of opening in 1963 in Kingston, that was the year the now Tri-City Lanes moved to Midtown. Current co-owner Keith Farmer worked for the former owner in 1981 and purchased the property in 2003.

  • Acting boot camp offered

    Obstacle courses may not be part of it, but an entertainment veteran plans on running students through their paces in a one-day drama boot camp.
    The boot camp, which will be at the Rockwood Event Center (the REC), is for serious, career-minded actors and is Saturday.
    The focus is on giving students the right tools to present themselves and promote themselves.
    Those include stage presence, developing style, picking songs for vocal ability and microphone techniques.

  • State parks celebrate Trails Day on June 1

    In conjunction with National Trails Day, Tennessee State Parks will host free, guided hikes on Saturday, June 1, encouraging outdoor enthusiasts to participate in several planned activities across the state. 
    Each state park will host its own special hike, offering a variety of family-friendly activities including historical hikes, educational programming, re-enactments and wildlife watching.
    From Fort Pillow to Standing Stone to Warriors’ Path and every state park in between, the National Trails Day hikes are designed for all ages and abilities.