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Today's News

  • Harriman property sales may help build city coffers

    Harriman Industrial Development Board has been busy selling buildings, and it hopes to soon send a chunk of that money the city’s way.

    The industrial board has sold multiple properties in the last year, including the former National Guard Armory for approximately $155,000, the former Browder Farm and Town building next to city hall for $27,000 and the Giles building, a Roane Street building that now houses Kim Inman’s real estate shop, for $30,000.

  • HANDS OF MERCY event

    Food and fun are cheap commodities if you attend this weekend’s Hands of Mercy Food Drive.

    All that organizers ask in return for the free festivities is that attendees donate a nonperishable food item to the drive from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday.

    Attendees can eat, thanks to Wampler’s Farm Sausage, just across the county line.

    “Wampler is going to give you a hot dog lunch with coke and potato chips,” said Sharon Pinner, Hands of Mercy director.

  • Nuts & Bolts Terri Likens Editor: RIP, API: Journalism training takes a big hit

    The American Press Institute is defunct.

    The API, a premier training institute for journalists, closed this month.

    That makes me sad.

    I was lucky enough to spend about a week at one of the Reston, Va.-based API trainings about five years ago.

    Even after all my years as a working journalist, the training I received there helped me — even today — make transitions that are often necessary in today’s changing news business.

  • Free Clinic treats 1,600 in two years

    The Free Medical Clinic of Oak Ridge has treated more than 1,600 individuals in 4,500 individual visits during its first two years of operation, board members recently learned during a three-year strategic planning meeting.

    The goal of the board is to continue the clinic’s mission, “People Caring for People,” and to increase services and hours at the clinic, which sees a number of patients from Roane County.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of March 28

    25 Years Ago
    A 45-pound beaver was found dead by the side of the road. It was believed to be one of three beavers that constructed a 7-foot-high dam in Walnut Hill off Hwy. 27. Its tail was 12 inches long and 5 inches wide. Harriman taxidermist Johnny Newberry stuffed the beaver for permanent display in the Harriman Utility Board lobby. Because of its uniqueness, the dam drew so many visitors that officials built a walkway leading to and from the site.

    10 Years Ago

  • Cole Thomas Tedder

    Cole Thomas Tedder celebrated his third birthday on March 3, with a Thomas and Friends-themed party at Harriman Community Center with family and friends.  

    He is the son of Marty and Robin Tedder of Harriman.

    Grandparents are Ernest and Barbara Tedder and Charles and Becky Lamance, all of Harriman.  

    Cole has an 8-year-old brother, Jace Simeon Tedder.

  • Arrests: March 10-20, 2012

    Editor’s Note: Readers are cautioned that some names may be the same as, or similar to, other members of the community.
    March 10 — Austin R. Taylor, 19, 819 Maple St., Princeton, Ky.: violation drinking age law. Bond $1,000; court date April 9.

    • Margaret Elizabeth Sampson, 41, 11 Clinton St., Harriman: criminal impersonation, violation of probation. Bond $31,000; court date April 30.

  • The Garden Gate: Consider the lily in this Easter season

    By Ellen Probert Williamson
    In ancient times, spices and perfumes were interchangeable. Herbs were used for everything from cooking and decorating to medicine.

    Rose water and musk were used to flavor foods. Vanilla and cinnamon were used as perfume.  Frankincense and myrrh, used both in the kitchen and in perfumes, were the gifts chosen for the Christ Child because they were the most valuable commodities in the ancient world.

  • GUEST OPINION: United States walks walk on free speech

    By KEN PAULSON
    First Amendment Center
    At the height of the controversy over the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect Intellectual Property Act debate, critics of the bills described them as an assault on Internet freedom and the subversion of the First Amendment.

    The advocates had a point. The proposed laws were arguably overbroad, and we should all be very careful before we give government greater latitude in shutting down websites.

    Still, it’s striking to see what a real attack on Internet freedom looks like.

  • News story puts hitch in murder trial

    The attorney for Milford Barnett asked the judge overseeing his client’s second-degree murder case for a continuance and change of venue.
    The trial was scheduled to start on Tuesday, but Walter Johnson claimed the jury pool was tainted by a story that appeared in the Monday edition of the Roane County News.