Today's News

  • More indicted in busted-up pill operation

    The oxycodone ring taken down earlier this year was a multi-million dollar enterprise.
    According to indictments in the case, a minimum of $4 million was paid directly or indirectly to the defendants during the course of the scheme that allegedly began in September 2010 and ended this past June.
    Twenty-three people from Roane County were indicted in U.S. District Court for oxycodone trafficking and money laundering conspiracies in June.
    A superseding indictment filed in the case this month charges an additional 10 defendants.

  • It takes teamwork to feed the hungry
  • Arrests: Nov. 11-19, 2012

    Editor’s Note: Readers are cautioned that some names may be the same as, or similar to, other members of the community.
    Nov. 11 — Lindsay Cheyenne Carter, 20, 103 Bales Ave., Harriman: driving on revoked/suspended license. Bond $1,500; court date Jan. 28, 2013.

    • Jason Lynn Cox, 39, 1432 Oakdale Hwy. Harriman: theft $1,000 but less $10,000, burglary. Total bond $5,000; court date Dec. 17.

  • THP to conduct December license checks in Roane County

    The Tennessee Highway Patrol will be conducting two December driver license roadside safety checkpoints in Roane County.

    The first checkpoint will be from 9 to 10 a.m. Dec. 7 on Hwy. 27 at the Morgan County line.

    Another is planned from 10 to 11 a.m. Dec. 14 on Pine Ridge Road at the railroad tracks.

    Recognizing the danger presented to the public by unqualified drivers, troopers will concentrate their efforts on vehicles being operated by drivers who would violate the driver license laws of Tennessee.

  • Three new stars in Legacy Society

    The Michael Dunn Foundation hosted a reception and dinner earlier this month to honor new members of the Michael Dunn Foundation Legacy Society.

    The members honored at the Legacy Society reception and dinner were The Knights of Columbus- Council 8273; In Memory of Albert Clark by Doris Clark; and In Memory of Donald Brown by his aunt, Sarah Coram, who was represented by her niece, Teina Ingram.

  • Dyllis Springs design snags top state honor

    Cope Associates won first-place for new school construction in the elementary category at the Tennessee School Boards Association annual convention.

    The architectural firm, which has offices in Knoxville and Nashville, won for its design of Dyllis Springs Elementary School in Roane County.

    “I knew we were going to win when I saw the competition,” Roane County Board of Education Chairman Rob Jago said.

    Dyllis Springs was misspelled on the award, but Jago said he didn't mind.

  • RSCC holiday concert set

    Roane Countians are welcome to get in the festive spirit by joining the Roane State Community College choral and instrumental ensembles in a holiday celebration.

    The college’s annual holiday concert will be at 7 p.m. Dec. 7 and at 3 p.m. Dec. 9 in the O’Brien Theatre on the college’s main campus in Roane County.

    The Concert Choir, Jazz Band, Celebration Singers, soloists and special guests,  including students from Midtown Elementary School, will perform.

    A $10 donation is suggested.

  • Homecoming choir aims to set season tone

    A free concert in Harriman’s Princess Theater today, Nov. 30, aims to put people in the Christmas spirit.

    The concert, which starts at 7 p.m., will be given by a gospel homecoming choir from many churches in Roane and Morgan counties.

    A love offering will be accepted to support Hands of Mercy in Kingston and Storehouse Ministries of Wartburg.

  • Mr. & Mrs. Whalen 50th

    Tony and Oneda Whalen of Harriman will be honored this weekend at a reception celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary.

    The event will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 2 in South Harriman Baptist Church’s family life center. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. The couple requests no gifts.

    The Whalens graduated from South Harriman High School, where they were high school sweethearts. They married Dec. 29, 1962, in Childs Memorial Baptist Church, Harriman.

  • GUEST OPINION: Petraeus affair reminds us how little is private

    First Amendment Center
    National attention to the Petraeus affair is driven by everything from morbid curiosity to concern for national security. But for most of us, issues of privacy and the First Amendment also should take center stage.

    As shown by the FBI’s relatively quick trip through the online missives of Gen. David Petraeus’ trysts, not much — if any — of our electronic communication is genuinely “private,” not even for the director of the world’s largest spy agency.