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Today's News

  • Region's top teacher: Harriman Middle’s Smith says students ‘have to know you care about them’

    Harriman Middle School turned around its seventh-grade language arts scores last year.

    The growth was noticed by the Tennessee Department of Education, with officials planning to visit to see what the school is doing right.

    It is also what likely got assistant principal Leslie Smith, who teaches seventh-grade language arts, recognized as the Tennessee Association of Middle Schools East Tennessee Teacher of the Year.

    “She’s able to motivate kids and motivate adults,” Principal David Stevens said.

  • Dad pleads to slugging son for refusing soda

    Brent I. Litton, the father accused of punching his 6-year-old son in the face for not drinking soda, pleaded guilty to domestic assault in Roane County General Sessions Court on Oct. 7.

    Litton was originally charged with child abuse in the incident that occurred at 123 Willow Springs Road, Ten Mile, on Dec. 30, 2012.

    According to the warrant, Brenda Yates told police everyone was fixing their plates for dinner when Litton’s son said he wanted water because he was sick and couldn’t drink juice or Cokes.

  • Recycling bins in county offices

    Roane County officials are going green and making it easier for their staffs to help the Earth with the placement of recycling bins in each office.

    “I want to thank the officials of Roane County for joining me and the Roane County Highway Department in our efforts to Keep Roane Litter Free,” said Road Superintendent Dennis Ferguson, who placed the bins in the county offices.

    Bins are in the offices of officials at the Roane County Courthouse, the Sheriff’s Office and the Codes office.

  • Tennis court fate still up in the air

    The fate of tennis courts next to Kingston Community Center is still to be determined after Kingston officials deferred action on Oct. 1.

    Kingston City Council member Tony Brown said the courts are owned by the county but have been maintained by the city as per a previous agreement.

    The city pays the light bill, provides benches and nets and handles maintenance on the courts, which are in a state of serious disrepair.

  • Kingston official battling cancer

    Members of Kingston City Council were happy to see Councilman Kevin McClure’s burly figure rumble through the doors of the city hall meeting room Oct. 8.

    McClure showed for the evening’s full council session despite a cancer diagnosis and subsequent stomach surgery that waylaid him in September.

    McClure had a baseball-sized tumor removed from his colon on Sept. 27 and will soon begin chemotherapy in Oak Ridge.

  • Coming to a watery stop

    A Ford Explorer was almost fully submerged in Watts Bar Lake Friday afternoon along Winton Chapel Road near Rockwood.

    Authorities said the SUV plummeted into the water when the female driver, whose name was unavailable at press time, swerved to avoid hitting a deer on the roadway.

    The driver was taken to University of Tennessee Medical Center for treatment.

  • Harriman Happenings: Oct. 14

    Happy birthday to my niece, Cheryl Childress, on Oct. 11, and my nephew, Kelton Cannon. He will be 9 years old on Oct. 14.

    His grandmother, Sara D’Burn, will celebrate her birthday Oct. 14. Terry Littlejohn celebrated his special day on Oct. 13.

    May each of you have a happy and blessed day.

    Edward and Charles Agnes Hamlet Baldwin of Knoxville celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

    They were married on Oct. 5, 1963.

  • U.S. Bank awards grant to Michael Dunn Center

    The U.S. Bank Foundation recently awarded the Michael Dunn Center a $2,000 grant to help fund services to people with disabilities.

    This grant will help to feed those who live in the Michael Dunn Center Residential Habilitation Program.

    The Michael Dunn Center spent more than $215,000 in Fiscal Year 2013 to feed the residents in its 23 homes throughout Roane County.

    Michael Dunn Center currently serves 400 children and adults with developmental disabilities.

  • Out to Lunch: Nothing disastrous about Titanic tea at the Paris Apartment

    My previous “Out To Lunch” article mentioned that my wife, Carol, and I share the same birthday — plus, we got married on our birthday.

    Our son Barry, and wife Judy treated us for the celebration lunch that I wrote about in the article.

    This “Out to Lunch” was another birthday/anniversary celebration treat by Carol’s sister, Jean Miller. We also invited our son, Buddy, and his wife, Faye, to join us. They all live in Knoxville.

  • Three named to Oak Ridge board

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management recently appointed three new members to its advisory board.

    The agency appointed Wanda Smith, Noel Berry and Mary Hatcher to two-year terms to the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board, a federally chartered citizens panel that provides independent advice and recommendations about cleanup conducted throughout the Oak Ridge Reservation.