Today's News

  • Burglary at golf course rattles city

    A break-in at the Emory Golf Course in Harriman last week has officials thinking of getting cameras.
    Councilman Kenyon Mee said someone smashed the register and got a small amount of cash and drinks.
    “The new one is going to be around the $2,000 range,” Mee said of a register.
    Mee added that the  board had discussed a security system before.
    They are also considering going to a register that can do point-of-service transactions for debit and credit cards.

  • Local detective honored for his drug work

    Jason Mynatt’s resume just got more impressive.
    The detective with the Roane County Sheriff’s Office recently was named the Eastern District Narcotics Officer of the Year and the State Narcotics Officer of the Year at the Tennessee Narcotics Officers Association Training Conference.
    “It was an honor,” he said.
    Mynatt is a member of the Roane County Joint Drug Unit, which was named the Drug Unit of the Year at the conference.
    Rockwood Police Department detective Josh Rymer, a member of the unit, called the honor humbling.

  • Soldier for Germany in World War II talks of experiences, good and evil

    Unlike many former prisoners of war, German Army veteran Gerhard Hennes has fond memories of his time in captivity.
    A lieutenant in the Afrika Corps, Hennes spent two years in World War II POW camps — including a year at Crossville — after being captured at Tunisia in 1943 by the British.
    He said he ate well and was treated fairly by his captors, in stark contrast to how his own army dealt with the Russian prisoners he encountered in the autumn of 1941.

  • Kingston considers solar farm

    Kingston City Council members went down to the farm recently and came back enthusiastic and ready to plant.
    Solar panels, that is.
    Mayor Troy Beets and Council Members Don White and Norm Sugarman visited a solar farm in Franklin, as part of council’s ongoing consideration of placing such an operation in Kingston.
    A solar farm is a dense collection of solar panels that produce electricity, which can then be used or resold at a profit.

  • Bojangles looking at Midtown

    Popular chicken fast food chain Bojangles is considering locating in Midtown.
    “Bojangles has submitted a subdivision and site plan for Midtown for Nov. 28,” said Harriman Building Inspector Maria Nelson.
    The Harriman Regional Planning Commission will be in special-called meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 5 p.m. to consider the plan.
    Nelson said the restaurant is considering locating the fast food chain next to Physicians Plaza on Hwy. 70 in Midtown.

  • The vital issue Congress won’t address

    Center of Congress
    With the elections over, Congress faces a full plate of tough issues when it reconvenes.
    There will be a lot of talk about fiscal matters, “grand bargains,” and sorting out party caucuses.
    But there’s one vitally important question we’re certain to hear nothing about.
    That is Congress’s own behavior — and more specifically, the behavior of its members.

  • Court’s ruling on political spending under assessment

    First Amendment Center
    There’s one result from the election that we likely won’t know for months or even years: the full meaning of this year’s massive run-up in campaign spending.
    The U.S. Supreme Court, in its Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission decision in 2010, freed corporations, unions and others to spend as much on elections as they wish — setting up the circumstances for the financial version of Superstorm Sandy in this year’s races.

  • The Garden Gate: Abrams ensures we’ll always have trees

    The oldest living things on earth are trees.

    The famous Cedars of Lebanon are still just as the Bible describes them, but older still are Bristlecomb pines, which are native to the American Southwest, and have been dated back about 5,000 years.

    People have been fascinated for hundreds of years with bonsai, the tiny trees and miniature landscapes considered to be a living art. Bonsai, the smallest trees in the world, were developed in the Orient generations ago.

  • Santa rides the rails next month

    For the first two weekends of December, Santa Claus will leave his sleigh in the garage and climb aboard the Secret City Scenic Excursion Train.

    He will be aboard the excursion rides on Dec. 1-2 and Dec. 8-9 and is sure to delight children as he and Mrs. Claus make their way through the coaches passing out Christmas gift bags and posing for pictures.

    Southern Appalachia Railway Museum volunteers will have the train all decked out in true holiday style to add to the enjoyment of the trips and the season.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Nov. 21

    25 Years Ago
    According to hospital personnel at Chamberlain Memorial Hospital in Rockwood, the cost of having a baby had increased, but services had also improved. For a normal delivery and three-day hospital stay, new parents could expect to pay up to $1,560 or up to $2,400 for a Caesarean section. Some of the improvements include a cheery-looking hospital room with  televisions, sibling visiting hours, a relative allowed to assist in the delivery room, and a complimentary steak dinner for the parents before the mother’s discharge.