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Today's News

  • Deputy who arrests firefighter quits

    A Roane County Sheriff’s deputy has resigned after an altercation in which he charged a Rockwood firefighter with resisting arrest.
    Derek Kennedy resigned Monday night, according to Sheriff Jack Stockton.
    Kennedy’s weekend arrest of Rockwood Fire Department Capt. David Mitchell was under review by top brass at the sheriff’s office.

  • Morgan hires Laxton

    Cheryl Laxton has already filled out paperwork to go work for David Morgan in the Roane County Property Assessor’s Office. Laxton was a candidate in this year’s assessor’s race, but she dropped out with about two months to go in the campaign and endorsed Morgan, who would go on to defeat longtime incumbent Teresa Kirkham.

  • Gunman tried to force meth use

    A Rockwood man is behind bars for allegedly trying to force a woman to use methamphetamine.
    Arthur Paul Arwood, 50, was arrested Saturday and charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, aggravated kidnapping, aggravated assault and possession of a handgun during a drug felony.
    Rockwood police said they responded to Front Avenue on a call about a distraught woman.

  • Kingston triathlon grows on second attempt

    Some of the best athletes in East Tennessee and beyond competed for bragging rights Saturday morning in the second annual Storm the Fort Olympic Distance Triathlon at Kingston.
    Participation was up considerably from last year’s inaugural event, which drew 132 competitors. More than 200 athletes were involved this year, either as full-fledged triathletes or as members of relay teams.

  • Railway Museum to run its last dinner train for season Sept. 15

    Southern Appalachia Railway Museum’s schedule for September includes one-hour narrated excursions on Sept. 1 and Sept. 15.

    The one-hour narrated excursions depart at 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. both Saturdays.

    During the ride, passengers will hear the story of the Manhattan Project, which was one of the most remarkable industrial achievements ever accomplished.

    Regular ticket prices are $13 for ages 3-12 and $17 for adults.

  • The Garden Gate: Nature’s getting ready for fall

    The hydrangea is one of the loveliest of summer flowers that linger on into fall.

    It flourishes in either full sun or part shade, and in borders or containers. This old-fashioned bloom has been making a come back in popularity and is again available in a range of cultivars.

    Native to woodlands in both North and South America and East Asia, hydrangeas include more than 80 species of evergreen and deciduous shrubs and vines. Probably the best known and one of the most popular examples is the hydrangea macrophyllas.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Aug. 29

    25 Years Ago
    Cee Bee Food Store in Rockwood was advertising the following: Castleberry Beef Stew, 89 cents for a 24-ounce can; boneless chuck roast for $1.39 a pound; half gallon of Kay’s ice cream for $1.79; a gallon of 4-percent milk for $1.89; a 2-pound loaf of Kerns bread for 89 cents; and smoked hams for $1.19 a pound. Every Tuesday, seniors 62 and older received a 7 percent discount.

    10 Years Ago

  • Mr. & Mrs. Narramore 50th

    Mr. and Mrs. John Narramore of Kingston will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Sept. 1.

    Their children and grandchildren will host an anniversary reception from 2 to 4 p.m. Sept. 2 in Laurel Bluff Baptist Church fellowship hall. All relatives and friends are invited to attend.

  • Mr. & Mrs. Hicks

    Dianna Caine Hicks and Rocky “Billy” Hicks, both of Harriman, were married on Aug. 18 at 599 Morgan County Hwy., Harriman.

    Minister Richard Cox officiated during the 6 p.m. ceremony.

    The bride is the daughter of Kelvin and Lisa Armes of Harriman.

    The groom is the son of Bill and Shelia Hicks of Harriman.

    The bride was escorted by her father. Her son, McKinley Lough, was ringbearer.

    Following a wedding trip to Cape Coral, Fla., the couple is at home in Harriman.

  • GUEST OPINION: Copying music without paying does in artists

    By KEN PAULSON
    First Amendment Center
    Nashville’s Craig Carothers is a singer-songwriter whose livelihood depends on concerts and CD sales. Yet sometimes, his biggest fans make that job tougher.

    “I’ve had the experience more than once of having someone come up to me and — completely pure of heart — excitedly tell me they bought copies of my CDs when I was last in town and they enjoyed them so much they made copies for 15 or so of their friends,” said Carothers.