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Today's News

  • Lack of talk led to cellphone snafu, Farmer says

    Mike Farmer blamed a communication snafu for the high taxpayer funded cell phone bills incurred during his time as county executive. One of the bills was $660.25. Another one was $512.56. Several others ranged from $425 to $450.

    “It appears that there was a miscommunication between purchasing and the provider on the text messaging package when the line was established,” Farmer said.

  • Legislation would stymie Harriman annexation efforts

    Harriman officials aren’t too pleased about proposed state legislation that would require annexation of a territory by a municipality be subject to approval by the majority of the residents in the proposed territory.

    “We desperately need to annex in Midtown,” said Harriman Councilman J.D. Sampson.

    Harriman has invested heavily in the Midtown area. Investments include contributions to the Pinnacle Pointe Shopping Center anchored by Kroger and Lowe’s and the city’s part in the expansion of the Interstate 40 interchange.

  • GUEST OPINION: Something was missed in debate in Arizona

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer’s veto last week of SB 1062 — a controversial “religious freedom” bill few Americans read and even fewer understood — may well have been a defining moment in the history of gay rights in America.

    Post SB 1062, it will be politically difficult, if not impossible, to pass laws that are perceived to allow discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation — even to protect religion, even in red states with Tea Party-favored governors.

  • Putting on the dog

    Roane County Sheriff K-9 Deputy John Mayes and his four-legged partner, Max, paid a visit to some Bowers Elementary third-grade students.

    “I think we have a serious drug problem, and I want our children to be safe,” Lillian Stevens, third grade teacher, said.

    Stevens said having police officers come out and make themselves known takes a lot of the fear of them from the students.

  • Lon Mee work is wrapping up

    The movement of utilities on Lon Mee bridge on Harriman’s Pansy Hill Road is near completion.

    Harriman Utility Board manager Bill Young said they are running tests on the water line currently before putting it online.

    “The paving will come as the weather clears up hopefully pretty soon,” he said.

    The road has had temporary lane closures and workers directing traffic while the move was completed over many months. Several cuts in the road have been made to move the lines on both Pansy Hill and on Emory Drive as well.

  • Help sought for cemetery

    Bullard Cemetery sits almost forgotten off Old Roane Street in Harriman, but help is on the way.

    Ralph Magill hopes more people may come forward who know someone buried at the cemetery next to the former Harriman Baptist Tabernacle building.

    “I received five letters on it so far,” said Magill.

    He hopes to get a crew from the Morgan County Correctional Facility for cleanup help. In addition to clearing out the wooded area, more hard work is needed.

  • Raiderettes come up short in title game

     

    The 2013-14 season came to a close Saturday afternoon for the Roane State Raiderettes as Monica Boles’ squad dropped a 76-57 decision to Walters State in the championship game of the TCCAA Region VII Tournament.

    The Raiderettes had advanced to Saturday’s finals less than 24 hours earlier with an 86-65 victory over Southwest Tennessee.

  • Roane project up for kudos

    Roane County’s Paw Paw Creek mitigation, completed by S&ME Inc., is among five Knoxville area projects nominated for the American Council of Engineering Companies of Tennessee’s 2014 Tennessee Engineering Excellence Awards.

    The award, one of the highest honors a project team can receive, is considered the “Academy Awards of the engineering industry.”

    S&ME provided compensatory mitigation services for the area of Paw Paw Creek to compensate for environmental impacts on the area.

  • Bright new to Angus group

    Riley Wayne Bright of Rockwood is a new junior member of the American Angus Association.

    Junior association members are eligible to register cattle in the American Angus Association, participate in programs conducted by the National Junior Angus Association and take part in Association-sponsored shows and other national and regional events.

    The American Angus Association is the largest beef breed association in the world, with more than 24,000 active adult and junior members.

    The national association is headquartered in St. Joseph, Mo.

  • Work-related fatalities down for second year

    Total fatalities and days away from work as a result of injuries and illnesses were both improved in Tennessee for the second consecutive year, according to a workplace safety report released by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Develop-ment.