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Today's News

  • Vandy to continue major research on vaccines, treatment

    Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program has received a contract from the National Institutes of Health to continue its work as one of the nation’s Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units.
    Vanderbilt is one of nine institutions that have the potential to receive funding up to $135 million per year from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the NIH, over a seven-year period.

  • Rockwood official claims inspector-hiring illegal

    Rockwood City Councilwoman Peggy Evans expressed her suspicions of Sunshine Law violations during a vote that established Harold Ishman as a part-time building inspector.
    When the resolution was put to the vote to hire Ishman, a former Rockwood City Council member, Evans disapproved.
    She also made the accusation that council members were asked in advance if they would vote for Ishman.
    “In fact, I want to file breaking of the Sunshine law,” Evans said.

  • Harriman considers charter changes

    A city manager form of government is again being discussed in Harriman.
    Councilman Ken Mynatt said he’d talked to the area state legislators, who told him they should get any charter change proposals to the state as soon as possible.
    “Time is kind of of the essence,” Councilman Lonnie Wright agreed.
    Councilman Buddy Holley got input from council members, which he incorporated into a proposal. They discussed it at lastweek’s  workshop.

  • Some lines clear, others blissfully blurred

    Decades ago, I lived in Cumberland Gap, a historic little town split between the Old Dominion and the Volunteer State.
    I’ve straddled the Tennessee-Virginia line aplenty.
    But last weekend, on State Street in Bristol, the dual-state thing was a bit  more literal.
    I stood — and even strode — with one foot in Tennessee and the other in Virginia.
    For blocks, the street through the well-preserved downtown has bronze markers embedded in the center to make sure you know which side is whose.

  • First responders appreciation

    KAITLIN KEANE/Roane Newspapers
    Roger Parker prepares lunches to go for the Rockwood Fire Department Wednesday during the first responders fish fry appreciation. Renaissance Terrace hosted the luncheon for the local first responders.

  • Rockwood beggars law loses backing

    When a panhandling ordinance first was discussed last month, Rockwood City Council seemed  united in support of stringent restrictions.
    Things have changed.
    Councilman Pete Wright said he found that the proposed ordinance is unnecessary and current laws provide for dealing with people who aggressively ask for money.
    The ordinance would have limited where panhandling takes place and added other restrictions.
    Councilwoman Peggy Evans remained an advocate of the proposal.

  • Cancer victim in Catch-22

    What can someone do when she makes too much to qualify for government health insurance but not enough to cover the extreme costs of cancer treatment?
    That’s what Tammy Jenkins would like to know.
    She said she draws $50 too much in disability to qualify for TennCare — and because her cancer is not breast or cervical — she does not meet other requirements to be part of the TennCare enrollment.
    She suffers from adenoid carcinoma of the right lung and lymph node.
    “I was diagnosed July of last year,” she said.

  • Gatton eager to show new side of manufacturing

    Bob Gatton wants to spread a simple but powerful message:

    Manufacturing is not what it used to be.

    “When you start talking about factories, people have this mental picture of being covered in soot,” Gatton said. “That’s just not true anymore. Most factories are clean and automated.”

    As director of Roane State Community College’s National STEM Consortium Program, Gatton is in a position to train people for today’s high-tech manufacturing jobs.

  • Arrests: April 15-28, 2013

    Editor’s Note: Readers are cautioned that some names may be the same as, or similar to, other members of the community.
    April 15 — Jennifer Reshae Scearce, 21, 1531 Maple Lane, Greenback: complimentary hold. No bond or court date listed.

    • Justin Vance Wallace, 169 Wilhite St., Doyle: reckless endangerment (after-trial mittimus). No bond or court date listed.

    • Waylon Bernard Ackerman, 31, 106 Rains Lane, Kingston: failure to appear. No bond listed; court date April 15.

  • Tennessee native ‘Father Jim’ new to St. Anthony’s

    St. Anthony’s Anglican Church, Crab Orchard, welcomes Father James C. Gibson Jr. as its new priest in charge.

    Gibson, known as “Father Jim” by parishioners from Roane, Cumberland and Rhea counties, began providing pastoral services to St. Anthony’s on Aug. 4.

    He, his wife, Robin, and son, Aidan, live in Crossville.

    In an official ceremony on Oct. 6, St. Anthony’s will officially accept Gibson as the mission’s new clergy.