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Today's News

  • The Garden Gate: Have chocolate to feel like royalty

    Tradition holds that the ancient Aztec emperor Motecuhzoma was so addicted to “chocoatl,” the sacred beverage made from cocoa beans, that he consumed 50 golden goblets of it a day.

    The earliest cocoa trees probably grew in the tropical lowlands of Central America and Mexico. An ancient Toltec myth gives credit to the feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl for first planting these trees and bringing chocolate, food of the gods, to human beings.

  • New HHA director can relate

    Amy Hall, Harriman Housing Authority’s new director, isn’t just experienced in working in public housing.
    She knows what it is like to live there.
    “It was a lonely life,” she said.

    Hall said she was raised by a single mother and lived at the housing project at Fiske Heights for 14 years.
    “We moved in when I was 4 years old and moved out when I was 18.”

  • FURLOUGHED: EPA ash spill cleanup chief must sit it out

    Federal government shutdowns have sidelined a key figure in the ash spill cleanup at TVA’s Kingston Fossil Plant.
    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is overseeing cleanup of the TVA ash spill at the Kingston Fossil Plant.
    Craig Zeller, project manager for the EPA, said he has been furloughed because of the government shutdown.
    He said oversight of the cleanup project is not being impacted, however.

  • Two arrested in Bluff Road holdup

    Two people were arrested on Monday in connection with an alleged armed robbery over the weekend.
    According to a press release from the Roane County Sheriff’s Office, a man walked into the Rocky Top Market on Bluff Road, pointed a handgun at clerks and demanded money.
    The press release listed Mark Andrew Randolph, 35, and Rufena Jean Bunch as suspects.
    Randolph is charged with aggravated armed robbery and possession of drugs.
    Bunch, 26, is charged with possession of drugs.

  • Truck-part maker fined by TDEC

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation fined DAYCAB Co. Inc. $2,825 last month. The Rockwood company makes commercial truck parts.
    The fine was for failure to apply for proper environmental permits and for damages TDEC incurred during its investigation.
    TDEC officials  conducted an inspection in October 2012. They said spray booths, a lamination area, grinding and other equipment were operating without construction and operating permits.

  • McCarroll vote still up in air

    If convicted sex offender Richard Keith McCarroll is allowed to vote, Roane County Administrator of Elections Charles Holiway said his office can’t make McCarroll mail in his ballot.
    “If he wants to vote personally, he’ll be able to vote personally,” Holiway said.
    Kingston attorney Chris Cawood is representing McCarroll in his effort to regain the right to vote. Cawood sees no reason why McCarroll should have to mail in his ballot, even though some voters take their children to the polls.

  • GO PINK
  • Good pumpkin hunting
  • Comments sought on debt form

    The Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury, through its Office of State and Local Finance, is seeking comment on revisions to a form that a local government is required to complete when it borrows money.
    The proposed revisions to the form CT-0253 can be viewed online at: http://www.comptroller.tn.gov/sl/pubdebt.asp
    The comment period will last from Oct. 1 through Nov. 15.

  • GUEST OPINION: Shield law may have unintended consequences

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    Inside the First Amendment
    We’re all facing a tough decision by Congress later this year — and it’s not about the federal budget or national health care policy.

    A question that ultimately will affect us all involves a bill with the innocuous name “Free Flow of Information Act.”