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Today's News

  • Social Security big part of Roane economy

    By BILL BISHOP & ROBERTO GALLARDO
    Special to Roane County News
    If Roane County residents didn’t receive their monthly payments from the Social Security Administration, 10.2 percent of total personal income in the county would be lost, a total of $183,271,150 in 2009.

    Roane County is more dependent on Social Security payments than is the rest of the country. Nationally, 5.5 percent of total personal income in 2009 came from Social Security payments. In Tennessee, 7.1 percent of all income comes from these payments.

  • Bowers plans garden for boys killed

    Bowers Elementary School is planning a memorial garden for two students who were killed in a  car accident this year.

    Gage and Jackson Brown, who were in the fourth and first grade, respectively, were killed along with their mother and infant brother in a fiery accident on Hwy. 61 in late August.

  • Reporter’s arrest impacts freedom of all citizens

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    The First Amendment right of a free press to publish the news absolutely requires that journalists be free to gather the news.

    So when police improperly arrest a journalist who simply is reporting at a scene, they do more than violate one person’s rights — they attack our collective, constitutional right to know from a free and independent source what our government is doing so that we may hold it accountable.

  • Teen suspended after incident

    A Harriman High School student was accused of assaulting Principal Scott Calahan on Oct. 27.

    However, the student and her father contend it was the other way around.

    The incident happened in the school gym. The student, Courtney Thomas, said Calahan had her cellphone, and she wanted it back.

  • Margrave Bridge removal firms up replacement resolve

    The bridge across the tracks on Margrave Drive may be gone but the hope that it may someday be replaced hasn’t diminished.

    Harriman City Councilman Lonnie Wright asked about the bridge at a meeting Tuesday.

    “Did anyone (in the city) approve the bridge being removed?” Wright asked.

    Mayor Chris Mason said no, and that he was still hopeful the state would come through with some assistance in funding the project. Mason said the cost should be less now that the railroad took it upon itself to remove the structure.

  • A view from Lick Skillet: Advice to Bill Haslam: Fire Bill Gibbons, now

    For some time now, we have felt that our Governor, Hon. Bill Haslam, was a nice guy, one with whom you would enjoy sitting around shooting the breeze.

    We did not vote for him, although we thought him more congenial than his opponent, Mr. McWherter.

    The one overwhelming factor that caused us to refuse to cast a favourable vote for Mr. Haslam was the feeling that in any contest between the interests of big business and of little people, Bill would unerringly fall into line with the interests of his fellow multi-millionaire big business buddies.

  • Student wins religious case against board

    By CHARLES HAYNES
    First Amendment Center
    If you wonder why many Christian parents view public schools as hostile to their faith, talk to Michael Ayers — father of a sixth-grader in the Pocono Mountain School District in northeastern Pennsylvania.

  • Things You Should Know

    Editor’s note: The deadline for including items in Calendar is at least one week before the event. Items appear as a public service as space is available. Unless otherwise noted, all events and activities are open to the public.

    MONDAY, NOV. 7

  • Nelson collecting court costs

    Long before she took office, Circuit Court Clerk Kim Nelson knew Roane County had a problem with collecting court costs.
    “People are assessed this money that they should pay, and they don’t pay it, and they’re walking away free without any punishment whatsoever,” Nelson said. “For years it’s just been accepted.”
    Not anymore. Nelson’s office has instituted a collections program for fines and court costs.

  • Rushing for the Lord

    Rockwood High school senior Ethan Headrick wants to be like former University of Tennessee and NFL great Reggie White on the football field.
    But more important, Headrick wants to be like White, an ordained minister, off the field.
    Headrick, a running back, has entered the ministry and preached last Sunday at his church, North Rockwood Baptist.
    He said he was at church camp in Myrtle Beach last December when he felt the calling.