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Today's News

  • Seniors should be on high alert for scammers

    By JASON ALDERMAN
    I look forward to the day when we no longer need to warn senior citizens about scams designed to separate them from their hard-earned money.

    I’m not holding my breath, however.

    According to the FBI, senior citizens make attractive targets for con artists for a variety of reasons:

    They’re more likely to have a nest egg, own their home and have good credit.

  • Kingston store has no plans to move

    A new Dollar General Store is under construction on Hwy. 70 near the new hospital. Roane County Executive Ron Woody said that hasn’t sparked discussions about the one in Kingston.
    “They’re not planning on closing the one in Kingston to our knowledge,” Woody said. “There’s probably enough demand for both of them.”
    The Dollar General in Kingston is connected to the Roane County Jail. Woody said the county would eventually like to acquire the Dollar General building, which is owned by Kingston developer Matt Caldwell.  

  • GUEST OPINION: When God-talk by children is protected speech

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES
    First Amendment Center
    If you ask a class of fifth-graders to write about someone they “look up to,” don’t be shocked when at least one of them decides to write about God.

    That’s exactly what happened in Millington, Tenn., earlier this month when 10-year-old Erin selected God as her idol because, as she explained, “He is the reason I am on this earth.”

  • No county primary planned

    Unlike 2012, the Roane County Republican Party doesn’t plan to have a primary election for county candidates in 2014. The party’s executive committee decided against it, according to an Aug. 8 letter addressed to the Roane County Election Commission.
    “The Roane County Republican Party Executive Committee has voted to not conduct a county primary election in 2014,” the letter said.
    Last week Roane County Republican Party Chairman James Ryan explained their reasoning.  

  • Getting charged up for reading
  • This time, Darnell gets to play

    When Darnell Hamilton took the field with Roane County High School’s marching band last Friday, he knew just what to do.

    From his wheelchair, he easily kept time with the band’s drum corps, even showing a bit of flair at the end of the pre-game performance.

    “He loves the band,” said his mother, Shirley.  “That is all he does is love music,”

    She said her special-needs son, who graduated from Roane County High in 2004, suffers from Crohn’s disease, and complications have wrecked his liver.

  • Roane sponsors NAACP event

    The Tennessee State Conference National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s 67th annual state convention and Civil Rights Advocacy Conference is coming to Oak Ridge, and Roane County’s unit is the host.
    The convention begins Thursday, and continues through Sept. 28.
    The conference will include leadership and motivational training, including the NAACP Game Changer Initiatives for the 21st Century at the convention workshops and forums.

  • Will we restrict stove fuel, too?

    Coleman fuel isn’t just popular among campers; tt’s also a favorite among meth-makers.
    “It’s a base,” Roane County Sheriff’s Office Deputy John Mayes explained.
    Pseudoephedrine, a decongestant in cold and allergy medicines, is the main precursor used in meth production, according to law enforcement officials. However, other legal products are used to make meth.
    Police reports often list Coleman fuel, coffee filters, Drano, plastic bottles, lithium batteries, tubing and aluminum foil.

  • Ellis rejoins county commission budget committee

    Randy Ellis has rejoined the Roane County Budget Committee.

    The District 2 commissioner served on the committee in 2010-11 before upsetting County Executive Ron Woody over some postings on Facebook.  

    Woody is the chairman of the budget committee. He didn’t seek to reappoint Ellis to the committee at the September 2011 commission meeting.

  • Hunters take aim at logging

    Hunters are taking aim at state officials over extensive logging on Mount Roosevelt and Catoosa wildlife management areas.
    Barry Brown of Rockwood said what’s happening is sportsmen in the area are running out of public land to hunt on.
    “There’s no place to go hunting unless you know somebody or have a lease,” he said, disgustedly looking over a recently logged section of land on Airport Road near Interstate 40.