Today's News

  • Jackets pick up split in opener

    The Kingston Yellow Jackets and Lady Jackets played their season opening games on Tuesday. 

    The Jackets took one on the chin, losing 7-0 to Sequoyah. The Lady Jackets, on the other hand, played a good game overall, coming away with a 7-6 win against Alcoa.

  • Pair of blood drives March 25 in Harriman

    Medic Regional Blood Center has a need for all blood types, particularly O-negative.

    Roane Countians can help out during a couple of blood drives on March 25.

    A Tennessee Technology Center at Harriman blood drive will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the school’s lower-building conference room.

    A Medic mobile unit will be at Harriman Food City from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

  • Commodity foods to be distributed in March

    Mid-East Community Action Agency will have its quarterly distribution of USDA commodity foods this month.

    The schedule is:

    • Rockwood First Baptist Church, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 22.

    • Kingston Community Center, from 10 a.m. to noon March 27.

    • Blair Fire Hall, Oliver Springs, from 2 to 3 p.m. March 27.

    • Harriman Community Center, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 28.

    Commodity food recipients should be certified.

  • Mechatronics program info sessions set at RSCC’s Roane campus March 20

    Anyone interested in Roane State Community College’s new high-tech mechatronics program is invited to information sessions on Wednesday, March 20 at the college’s Roane County campus in Harriman.

    The information sessions will be held at 11:15 a.m. and 3:15 p.m. in room O-106 in the O’Brien Humanities Building. Visitors only need to attend one of the sessions.

    Mechatronics includes instruction in electronics, mechanics, computer science, robotics and process control.

  • Parting shot: Oliver Springs' Christopher scores for the Lady Mocs

    Former Oliver Springs High School star Kayla Christopher (No. 3) celebrates following Chattanooga’s 64-63 victory over Davidson in the Southern Conference Tournament championship game Monday evening in Asheville, N.C.

    Christopher, a senior, scored 7 points, including the game-winning basket with 8.2 seconds remaining, to give the Lady Mocs the victory.

    The victory also gives Christopher and her Lady Moc teammates a berth in the NCAA Tournament that starts next weekend.

  • GUEST COLUMN Pity the poor children; DCS secrecy shameful

    By Kent Flanagan, Tennessee Coalition for Open Government

    Tennessee Department of Children’s Services has one of the toughest, most unforgiving jobs in state government — to protect the most vulnerable children in our society from harm — but few Tennesseans know much about the agency.

    Most details about Children’s Services operations are denied to the public by confidentiality required under state law to protect the privacy of the children and the families that come into contact with DCS.

  • DAR honors Marsh’s devotion to cemetery

    Noel F. “Buddy” Marsh Jr., front at far right, is honored by the Avery Trace Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, with the Historic Preservation Recognition Award for his more-than-44-year dedication to the preservation, care and maintenance of Kendrick Cemetery in Rockwood.

  • Legislative relief for ash-spill impacts?

    State Sen. Ken Yager and state Rep. Kent Calfee are sponsoring a bills in the General Assembly that would provide relief for delinquent taxpayers because of the TVA ash spill.

    “For tax years 2009 and 2010, requires the waiver of all delinquent tax penalties and the reduction of interest to a rate of 5 percent, for delinquent taxpayers who had real property damaged by a coal ash spill,” a summary of the bill states. “Requires eligible taxpayers to apply for such relief to the assessor of property.”

  • Edgewood land transferred to Dunn Center

    The Roane County Commission approved a resolution allowing transfer of the Old Edgewood School building and property on Gallaher Road to the Michael Dunn Center.

  • GUEST EDITORIAL 1st Amendment: One woman’s lesson in liberty

    By Ken Paulson, President, First Amendment Center
    In 1940, a group of community leaders in Champaign, Ill., joined together to give young people a better moral foundation by offering religion classes in the public schools.

    It was creative, thoughtful and well-intended.  It was also unconstitutional.

    The Champaign public school district’s decision to invite representatives of multiple faiths to teach in its classrooms led to a historic U.S.  Supreme Court decision handed down 65 years ago on March 8, 1948.