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Today's News

  • Rockwood police make drug arrests

    Crack cocaine was allegedly found on a Rockwood man already wanted on drug charges.

    According to an arrest report, a Rockwood police officer saw Elvin Landis Witherspoon walking in Evans Heights on Thursday.

    The report said Witherspoon, 30, was arrested after the officer was advised of his active warrants for drug charges.

    “Upon taking subject into custody, he advised he had a $20 rock in his left pocket,” the report said. “I removed it and he stated that it was crack cocaine.”   

  • Rockwood holding the line on property taxes

    Rockwood City Council approved a budget that leaves its property tax rate at 75 cents per $100 valuation and gives its employees a 3 percent raise.

    Council member Pete Wright likes the budget as it stands.

    “I see no reason to make any changes as we go into this coming year,” he said.

  • Harriman leader wants more TVA funding for city

    Harriman City Council member J.D. Sampson is still on his crusade to secure part of the $900,000 he said still remains of TVA restitution monies available for the Kingston Fossil Plant ash spill.

    “We lost gas, water and power in Swan Pond,” he said of the December 2008 disaster. “Kingston didn’t lose nothing.”

    He points out that the Swan Pond area is in Harriman’s urban growth boundary, and TVA’s subsequent purchase of properties takes away potential property tax revenue and utility customers from the city.

  • Officials eyeing recruiter for development

    Harriman is the latest Roane County municipality to consider hiring an industrial or retail recruiter to draw business to the area.

    “In my opinion, with Midtown coming on like it is, I think either you all  or us need to have a retail recruiter of our own,” Mayor Chris Mason recently told the Harriman Economic Development Board.

    He praised the work of Darrell Williams, The Roane Alliance’s director of business development, but added, “I think we have enough to keep Darrell busy.”

  • ‘I think God was very good to us’: Kingston United Methodist rebuilding to be done in October

    Change is in the air at Kingston United Methodist Church.

    After fire engulfed the sanctuary April 30, church leaders and members have been coordinating details in the rebuilding process.

    Rebuilding is estimated to be completed in October (“It could be sooner or later – I don’t know,” Pastor John Anderson said), and the church’s insurance coverage has taken care of all the more than $1 million in damage.

    “I think God was very good to us,” pastor John Anderson said.

  • Not the eggman, but maybe the walrus

    Kingston resident Fay Eblen shows off her walrus-shaped cucumber she picked in her garden late last month.

    While it’s not known if the mustached cuke is Paul, as The Beatles sing in “Glass Onion,” it’s pretty obvious that he bears an uncanny resemblance to that other tune, “I Am the Walrus.” 

    Goo goo g’joob.

  • Kudos to Dunn Center

    Kingston Rotary Club recently presented its vocational service award for those who have demonstrated high ethical standards and values in their dealings with the community and the clients they serve.

  • Sheriff's youth camp takes to the water

    Cassi Maggard, Adele Phillips (first photo) and Emily Thompson (second photo)  take a cruise on the Sheriff's boat on Watts Bar Lake at the end of the Sheriff's Youth Camp last month.

  • Tackle those fishing needs at new Kingston shop

    New Chamber member The Tackle Box recently had its grand-opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony.

    Among the Chamber members and dignitaries attending are, front row from left, Jenny Tippens, Cassandra Miles, Kingston Mayor Troy Beets, Bob Tonachio, The Tackle Box owners Mike and Rachel Ellis, Jonathan Holland, Justin Capps; and back row, Darrell Williams of The Roane Alliance, Kim Ezzell and Preston King.

  • Chamber’s calling card encourages interaction

    The Roane County Chamber of Commerce has designed a special “calling card,” encouraging members to do business with other Chamber members.

    The unique 1-by-3 1/2-inch card is smaller than a standard business card. The size makes it easier to carry and helps it stand out among other business cards.