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Today's News

  • FORE!

    Kingston resident Jim Smith takes a swing on the green during a recent outing at Southwest Point Golf Course.

  • Training program receives grant

    Roane State Community College’s Advanced Materials Training and Education Center is the recipient of a $5,000 grant from Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
    ORNL recently won a Gordon Battelle Prize for scientific discovery and technology impact.
    As a Gordon Battelle Prize winner, ORNL was given the opportunity to direct a $5,000 education grant to the school (K-12 or higher education) of its choice.

  • Sisterly milestone: Triple nifty at 50

    The Stout triplets are still as close as ever as they approach their 50th birthday.

    Representing three out of 12 siblings (six boys — two of whom are twins — and six girls), Paula Ann Stout Pavlik, Patricia Ann Stout Phillips and Pamela Ann Stout Edmonds will celebrate 50 years of memories with each other on March 12.

    “We’re a very close family,” Edmonds said during one of the sisters’ ritual lunch outings at Gondolier Restaurant in Harriman.

  • Bonuses indicate school board is OK with McGriff

    As the Roane County Board of Education gets ready for a discussion on who will lead the schools in the future, the current leader’s most recent performance bonus indicates board members think she’s done a good job.  

    Director of Schools Toni McGriff received $15,000 out of a possible $15,000 last year.

    It was the highest performance bonus she’s earned since becoming director of schools in 2005.

    The bonuses are based on school board evaluations. A point system determines the amount.

  • Jellico tops Harriman for region title, 70-68

    Two days after a dramatic 85-83 victory over Wartburg in the Region 2-A semifinals, the Harriman Blue Devils were in another nail-biter Thursday night, but the results weren't as good as Jellico downed the Blue Devils 70-68 in the Region 2-A championship game at Harriman.

  • Tight quarters hinders recycling

    At the Roane County Recycling Center, space has become an issue.

    “It’s really hard to take care of everything that needs to be done,” said solid waste coordinator Ralph Stewart.

    Over the past five years, the recycling center’s intake of cardboard has soared from approximately 20 tons of cardboard a month to 20 tons a week.

  • With revolution, democracy may not be enough

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES
    The revolutions sweeping across Northern Africa and the Middle East could mark the beginning of a historic advance for democratic freedom — ranking in significance with such milestones of liberty as the American Revolution of 1776 and the disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991.
    Or these upheavals could end with one tyranny replacing another, as happened after the French Revolution of 1789 and may yet occur in post-Soviet Russia.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET by Gerald Largen: Recent outrages require comment & criticism

    Kind reader, we are not unaware of the fact that since the beginning of the new year we have failed to follow our usual pattern of choice of subject matter upon which to write these weekly columns.
    From the inception of these columns we have tried, and generally been successful in writing about several different fields.
    These have included history, biography, reminiscences, travel, gastronomy, gardening, tributes — both current and post mortem, law, philosophy and politics.

  • County's unkempt property addressed

    Roane County Commissioner Randy Ellis wants all county owned property in the city of Harriman brought to city and county code as soon as possible.
    Officials in Harriman recently discussed a piece of county-owned property at 420 Clifty St. that was so unkept the vegetation had overgrown.

  • DAR genealogy forum brings records to life

    Tramps, American Revolutionary War veterans, government leaders and trouble makers might all be part of someone's ancestry.

    Finding these people and the diverse stories that make history come alive are part of the appeal for genealogy researchers.

    “Yes, it is true they come to life. You really get to feel you know them,” said Cathy Johnson.