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Columns

  • A view from Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen

    All right class, we are going to start the lessons with a pop quiz.
    What president of the U.S. during an eight year tenure in that office got the Congress to raise taxes a total of 11 times, thus averaging more than one tax increase each year?
    The answer appears at the end of this column. (If you listened to NPR’s “Morning Edition”, last Friday, [WUOT, 5 a. m. to 7 a.m., repeated 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., each weekday,] you will immediately have the answer.)
    ******

  • IMPRESSIONS by Johnny Teglas

    A tough guy … that’s what most of us weekend warriors like to think of ourselves.
    Fact of the matter is, we’re all pretty much far from it, as the Boss reminds me quite often.
    Just a few days ago, the most wonderful woman on God’s green earth shook “my world.”
    “Quit whining!” she ordered.
    Weenie that I am, I immediately complied.
    Still, I secretly pined inside.
    When I awoke and showered before church, I could tell something wasn’t just right.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: Justice Clarence Thomas shows true colors

    In olden times, persons with serious intellectual impairment were classified in the following order: the moron was the less impaired; the imbecile was more impaired; and, the idiot was the most impaired.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: Laughing at yourself to keep from crying

    The other day, a Facebook friend admitted to picking up a TV remote and trying to dial a phone number on it.

    As someone who has tried to change the channels with my phone, I could relate.

    I’ve also pointed my remote car key at the TV to turn it on. I’ve even distractedly pointed it at the house to lock or unlock the carport door.

    It seems that while we (and by we, I mean people older than the age of 35) embrace new technology, we aren’t quite the whiz kids with it that many in the younger generations are.

  • Impressions: Some hits, some misses, some other

     

  • A view from Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen

    Gentle readers, be not disturbed if you do not immediately recognize the name Hetty Green, for she has not been prominent in the news for more than three-quarters of a century.
    But around 1900, Hetty Green was the richest woman in the entire world!
    And the tabloids of the period often wrote of her on account of her miserly ways.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: Warming up to a good book

    Today I will have the pleasure of spending the evening with a book club on River Road.

    I’ve been looking forward to it since last November, when they originally asked me to join them for the session.

    I enjoy talking about good books, hearing what everyone else is reading and sharing the ones I love best.

    Recently, I temporarily swapped my copy of Edward Abbey’s classic Desert Solitaire for a friend’s copy of Ferrol Sams’ Run with the Horsemen.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: Warming up to a good book

    Today I will have the pleasure of spending the evening with a book club on River Road.

    I’ve been looking forward to it since last November, when they originally asked me to join them for the session.

    I enjoy talking about good books, hearing what everyone else is reading and sharing the ones I love best.

    Recently, I temporarily swapped my copy of Edward Abbey’s classic Desert Solitaire for a friend’s copy of Ferrol Sams’ Run with the Horsemen.

  • IMPRESSIONS by Johnny Teglas

    We find our fun where we can here at the newspaper.
    Otherwise, we’d all just go bonkers.
    When I read editor Terri Likens’ column last Friday, I had to chuckle at her pirate-speak.
    Reading further it dawned on me she and I were on the same wavelength.
    Our brief chat after deadline confirmed my suspicion
    We are both “over it.”
    Our short exchange reminded me of a film from way back in the day.
    Anyone remember “Network”?
    It won four Academy Awards.

  • A View from Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen

    The stories telling of the new Republican leadership in the House of Representatives instituting the reading of the Constitution at the beginning of the session was interesting.
    While we approve strongly of the Representatives reading the Constitution, as we think every citizen should read it periodically, in the case of the law-makers, it might raise the calibre of the laws they adopt if, in lieu of the Constitution, they were to read these selfsame laws before voting on them.