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Columns

  • GOING with the FLO: Leaky lessons can be learned from our history

    By FLO CHARLES

    If we are to survive, we must restore the true vision of faith and freedom where God is sovereign again.

    George Washington said that “the propitious smiles of heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which heaven itself has ordained. We must restore religious liberties in our land or we can be assured that the smiles of heaven will soon turn to wrath.”

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: We share some memories, but some we don’t

    Sympathetic reader, although she was allotted a full score more than the scriptural three score and ten years, it still seems that four score and ten years was not enough time for us to have the privilege that came with knowing Polly Burnette, for her time was always devoted to serving others and bringing happiness to all those with whom she came into contact.

  • GOING with the FLO – Pay attention: Some facts simply cannot be ignored

    By Flo Charles

    I must emphasize these important facts that cannot be ignored. We are seeing the effects of Saul Alinskiy’s “Rules for Radicals” more and more.

    We must pay attention. They pick a target, freeze it, polarize it and continue to attack it over and over.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: Our random thoughts on miscellaneous topics

    Today we give you a collection of our random thoughts on miscellaneous topics:

  • GLIMPSES: Do we have an identity problem?

    By MARK BANKER

    As a grade-school student, I relished the arrival of The Weekly Reader, a little newspaper that introduced children to current events and public concerns.

    One issue, however, left me puzzled.

    This was the early-1960s, and Appalachia had captured the nation’s attention. Photos and an accompanying story presented an impoverished backward region, where children did not have shoes, strip-mining ravaged the land, and people lived in squalor.

  • OPEN GOVERNMENT: Tenn. constitution not a relic — yet

    By DEBORAH FISHER

    Last week’s account of a state worker snatching a meeting agenda packet from a news reporter’s hands was a low point in the open government ethic of Tennessee.

    I wish it were the only one.

    At a public meeting of the Douglas Henry State Museum Commission, Nashville Scene reporter Cari Wade Gervin picked up a meeting packet laying on the table that contained a proposed new operating policy, including a new Code of Conduct for commissioners. She was trying to copy down information in it.

  • From the EDITOR’S Desk: Want officials to listen? Speak up

    Not everyone can run for office and become an elected official. It usually takes a lot of time and sometimes a lot of money.

    That doesn’t mean that average folks can’t participate in their local government. Probably the easiest way to make your voice heard is to show up at meetings and workshops of the city and county government.

    Over the years that I’ve covered these local government meetings I’ve always been dismayed at how few people take advantage of the opportunity to participate in these meetings.

  • GOING with the FLO: Our monuments serve as reminders of our heritage

    By FLO CHARLES

    Editor’s note: The opinions expressed in this column do not reflect the views of this newspaper.

    First, I want to congratulate Gerald Largen for all the years he has been keeping us abreast of the events in our county and nation. He has been very faithful to use his talents to open our eyes about important activities and citizens around our county, as well as showing honor to those faithful older citizens and the newer generation.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: Just a little consistency mightn’t offend Emerson

    Editor’s note: The opinions expressed in this column do not reflect the views of this newspaper.

  • GLIMPSES: Traditions are borne of history’s spin

    I begin today with a few more thoughts on our public memory.

    Humans have always been curious about how the past relates to the present. Hence, ancient myths addressed such essential questions as “Where did we come from?” or “How should we behave?”

    For millennia, metaphorical answers to these and other queries were typically accepted on faith. They offered adherents a “mythical public memory.”