.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Editorials

  • GUEST OPINION: Teacher needs a few lessons, too

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    In this contentious election year, it seems almost quaint to hear someone insist that it’s socially incorrect — and possibly illegal — to criticize the president of the United States as opposed to a candidate for the office.

  • GUEST OPINION: Reaction against terror went too far

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    The terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, posed many issues for our nation as to how to respond, and what lengths to go to, in the name of national security.

    In some cases, new safety rules have meant minor inconveniences. No bottles with more than 3 ounces of liquid allowed in carry-ons on an airplane, for example.

  • GUEST OPINION: Legislature’s ‘monkey bill’ Trojan horse

    Depending on whose press release you believe, Tennessee’s new science law either promotes “academic freedom” or “allows creationism to be taught in public schools.”

    Enacted on April 10, the legislation instructs school officials not to prohibit teachers from informing students about the “scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses” of “scientific controversies” such as biological evolution.

  • Guest Opinion: Win for CIA is loss for rest of us

    By KEN PAULSON
    First Amendment Center
    Governments like to keep things secret. To be fair, some government officials see the benefit of the free flow of information, but governments reflexively tend to keep things from public view, particularly if the information may raise questions about government conduct.

    Of course, our guarantees of freedom of speech and press were instituted in part to keep an eye on people in power.  If we’re to assess effectively how well our public servants are doing their jobs, we need access to information.

  • Withholding news right call under rare conditions

    Journalists are in the business of telling the news, not hiding it.
     But there are times — very few times, despite conspiracy-and-bias claims fueled by a media-criticism cottage industry — when news organizations do decide to hold the news that they know.
    These instances are rare enough that when they happen, it’s news in itself.

  • GUEST OPINION: When zero tolerence is zero judgment

    By DAVID L. HUDSON Jr.
    First Amendment Center
    Kids shouldn’t be suspended for relatively innocent acts, particularly if they involve speech not intended to cause harm. Yet many public school officials overreact, even imposing suspensions or expulsions on kids for what often are innocent comments or juvenile acts.

  • GUEST OPINION: Journalists face attacks, death in much of world

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    The world news items about reporters killed, news organizations harassed, and unsolved crimes committed against journalists in other nations come nearly daily, generally in one or two paragraphs at most in a newspaper or online.

    These attacks around the globe demonstrate the huge difference between press freedom as we know it in the United States and press freedom elsewhere.

  • GUEST OPINION: Confederate prom dress doesn’t pass muster

    It’s not often that a prom dress triggers a First Amendment controversy, but a Tennessee high school student’s attire did just that.

    Gibson County High School student Texanna Edwards was turned away from her high school prom on April 21 because she was wearing a dress that bore a striking resemblance to a Confederate flag. According to the Jackson Sun, school administrators viewed the dress as inappropriate and potentially offensive.

  • Our Opinion: Tweets and courts really can co-exist

    Twitter has become a tool of the trade for America’s journalists, but judges are grappling with how to deal with the messaging in courtrooms.

    According to an article by the Associated Press, “the micro-blogging site is increasingly putting reporters on a collision course with judges who fear it could threaten a defendant’s right to a fair trial.”

    We’ve been down this path before, most notably with television.

  • OUR OPINION: Harriman’s leadership shows again

    It has been a big spring for the city of Harriman.

    Despite criticism from some, officials there have formally opened their beautifully refurbished grand old theater.

    We are inclined to agree with those who believe the Princess Theatre will stop the decline and restore the heart and soul to Harriman’s downtown.

    City officials also have garnered major support in their idea to turn the old Roane Medical Center, which will be abandoned when the new hospital is completed in Midtown, into a Veterans Affairs hospital.