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Editorials

  • GUEST OPINION: Can yoga be twisted into religion?

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES
    Is yoga secular or religious?

    That’s the conundrum at the heart of a new legal battle in Encinitas, Calif. over the teaching of yoga in public schools.

    In a lawsuit filed last month, a couple with two children in the Encinitas schools charge that the district is unconstitutionally promoting religion by giving yoga classes twice a week to students during the school day.

    School officials insist that the yoga classes are for physical fitness – and have nothing to do with religion or religious indoctrination.

  • OUR OPINION: Who is minding the store in Rockwood?

    Anyone seeing the list of alleged purchases made by former Rockwood public works director Tom Pierce should be furious that he was able to misuse public money with so little oversight.

    Eleven guns, ammo, women’s jeans, an online degree program, music, and not one, but two high-end digital cameras are among the personal items authorites said he purchased over a three-year period.

  • GUEST OPINION: When do student prayers cross the line?

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES
    First Amendment Center
    Students are free to pray in public schools – except when they aren’t.

    If this sounds confusing, pity school administrators charged with figuring out if and when to draw the line on student prayers.

  • OUR OPINION: Aytes marriage to employee is, indeed, conflict

    The selection of Gary Aytes as Roane County Schools director has been welcomed by many — and rightly so.

    At a time when funding and teachers’ employment issues have caused tension elsewhere, he has boosted morale among teachers and parents in Roane County.

    Aytes also has found love along the way.

    At a school board meeting last month, Aytes was congratulated on his recent marriage to Glenna Treece, a well-respected former Midtown Elementary School principal who now works as the school system’s parent involvement coordinator.

  • How big? An unresolvable argument

    By LEE H. HAMILTON
    A few weeks ago, in his second inaugural speech, President Obama waded into the longest-running argument our history offers.
    “Progress does not compel us to settle centuries-long debates about the role of government for all time,” he said, “but it does require us to act in our time.”
    He had just laid out a rationale for government action on infrastructure, protecting the security and dignity of people, climate change, inequality, the strength of arms and the rule of law.

  • Lone Star State gets failing grade for Bible courses

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES
    First Amendment Center
    Fifty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional the devotional use of the Bible by public schools, in its ruling on Abington Township v. Schempp.
    But many school districts in the Lone Star State still haven’t gotten the message, according to a report released last month by the Texas Freedom Network entitled “Reading, Writing and Religion.”

  • GUEST OPINION: Inaugural prayers now weathervane

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES
    First Amendment Center
    Prayers delivered at presidential inaugurations are rarely quoted and quickly forgotten (at least in the earthly realm).

    But in today’s deeply divided America, who prays the prayers – and who doesn’t – is fast becoming a religio-political weathervane pointing in the direction cultural winds are blowing.

  • GUEST OPINION: 1st Amendment rode with Civil Rights effort

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    Assembly and petition are the “quiet freedoms” among the five rights set out in the First Amendment.
    Speech, press and religion are more often – or at least, more obviously – in the headlines. But during Black History Month, in February, the quiet kids on this corner of the constitutional block deserve at least as much attention as their better-known brethren.

  • Free speech and the right to be crass

    By KEN PAULSON
    President, First Amendment Center
    One measure of our freedom is how foolish we’re allowed to be in exercising our rights.
    Case in point: Joseph W. Resovsky of Columbia Station, Ohio, decided to provoke some people with a grossly insensitive post on his Facebook page referring to the shooting of schoolchildren in Newtown, Conn.: “I’m so happy someone shot up all those little (expletives). Viva la school shootings!!!!”

  • GUEST OPINION: Free speech and the right to be crass

    By KEN PAULSON
    President, First Amendment Center
    One measure of our freedom is how foolish we’re allowed to be in exercising our rights.

    Case in point: Joseph W. Resovsky of Columbia Station, Ohio, decided to provoke some people with a grossly insensitive post on his Facebook page referring to the shooting of schoolchildren in Newtown, Conn.: “I’m so happy someone shot up all those little (expletives). Viva la school shootings!!!!”