.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Letters

  • Strangers’ help, kindness lifts motorist’s heart

    One Sunday evening several weeks ago, just after dark, I was traveling home from Oliver Springs to Harriman along Hwy. 61.

    About five miles from home, I swerved left to miss firewood that had fallen from a truck into my lane.

    The result was a bent right front wheel, flat tire and no injuries.

    I was able to bring the car to rest on the right side of the roadway, out of traffic lanes, and called a wrecker.

  • 90th birthday celebration makes Greif feel happy

    Many thanks to all who turned out on March 11 for my 90th birthday at the Live and Let Live Drug Store.

    Thanks to all who donated to the Bernard-Greif scholarship fund at Roane State Community College.

    Special thanks to my daughter, Linda, who came from Memphis for my big day, and made all the arrangements for my birthday.   

    Thanks also to all the officials from all over the county who came.  

    It was, indeed, a happy day for me.

    I am so happy that I have lived this long.

  • Justice was served in Leon Houston’s federal sentencing

    My thanks to the Roane County News for the excellent front page article about the man (Leon Houston) who finally, finally, will receive a measure of justice in the prison system.

    I hope his stay will include a serious round of anger management training.

    As I understand it, there was once a time in our recent history when such personalities as his were subjected to a personality adjustment surgical procedure called a frontal lobotomy.

  • Bingo arrest of elderly ladies backfired on police

    The bingo article in the Feb. 26 edition of the Roane C0unty News brought back some memories of a true story that happened in Sumner County (Gallatin) while I was a resident of the county.

    Apparently bingo was considered a form of gambling by the state of Tennessee back in the 1980s. I can’t remember the exact year, but bingo was legal in Kentucky at that time.

    An elderly women’s club, a group who loved their bingo, had chartered a bus to take them to a Kentucky bingo parlor for a relaxing, leisurely, fun day of bingo.

  • Blinking lights to warn about police might backfire

    This is a rebuttal to Gene Policinski’s First Amendment Center column last week about how blinking headlights to warn of a police officer ahead may be legal.

    It may be your man-given right, but it is not God’s.

    Are you the type of person who loves to help your fellow man?

    How about that man, woman or teenager who has had too much to drink, or too much in the form of drugs, especially marijuana?

  • Through pancakes and support, lives can be changed

    The Rotary Club of Kingston hosted our annual pancake breakfast and silent auction on Feb. 8. More than 200 people were served, as folks enjoyed food and visited with their friends and neighbors in what has become an annual tradition.

    Funds will be used to support service projects such as providing dictionaries to each third grade student at Midway and Kingston Elementary Schools; awarding a scholarship to a nontraditional student at Roane State; and helping to provide kidney transplants for low-income children in Mexico.

  • He’d like to know the origin of Common Core

    I agree with the goals stated in the article about changing school standards in the Feb. 14 edition of the Roane County News.

    Our Tennessee students need to be prepared for life. State governors favor them.

    Forty-five states have adopted them.

    Local schools director Gary Aytes said the federal government did not initiate them.

    My question is where did these these Tennessee state standards originate? The headline makes it sound like they are a product of Tennessee educators.

  • Roughed-up family situation cause for alarm for others

    People in our neighborhood were very troubled by Teresa Holt’s letter to the editor a week ago about her family being wrongly cuffed, bruised and roughed up by Kingston and Roane County law enforcement officials.  

    If this family was stopped and mistreated solely on the basis of the color of their car matching a robbery suspect, then anyone could potentially be subjected to such frightening physical and emotional harrassment.  

    By far, most police officers display politeness, kindness and respect to the public during such stops.  

  • Buying vehicles outright is smart move by county

    A good friend, I see by the Roane County News, is running for county commission.  It seems to me he will be joining a good group.

    I was impressed with the decision the commission made to buy school buses outright, rather than borrow money to buy them — thereby saving the interest taxpayers would pay.  

    (I noticed this because I used to be on the school board and knew that they had to replace a certain number of buses each year.)  

    It turns out they’re doing the same thing with the sheriff’s patrol cars.

  • Better education should be priority for all residents

    The time is rapidly approaching when high school seniors will graduate, choose their career paths and plot their directions in life.

    Gov. Bill Haslam has embraced a new program that provides for all students to attend community colleges or technical schools in Tennessee.

    The Roane Writers Group has raised enough funds to award one Roane County senior a $2,500 scholarship plus a $500 cash award.