• Redistricting talks on schools are long overdue

    I refer to “School Redistricting” by Damon Lawrence on Page 1 of your July 10 issue.

    The school board’s workshop was held on July 7.

    The longtime great champion of school redistricting, James “Dub” Harmon, died on July 8.

    What lit the fire under the county school board to cause members to have a work session just prior to the beginning of a new school year? Is there something we are not being told?

  • Give them their rights, but ‘no’ on reparations

    Now that the highest court in the land has opined the LGBT community has been denied their constitutional rights to marriage privileges, will reparations become the next push to the left?

    Yes, denial of this right has inflicted financial inequities on this group of Americans since we became a country. But now, in modern times, the question becomes, should back-paid Social Security benefits for surviving spouses be a reparation cost of the new constitutional interpretation?

  • Pharmacies help fight against illegal drugs

    Pharmacists are to be commended: They fight the war on illegal drug use every day.

    You may not realize it, but they are even battling the meth cooks, who have quite a few tricks up their sleeves. One is to send associates into any number of pharmacies and grocery stores to buy products like Sudafed, which contain pseudoephedrine, for the meth maker to use in his deadly concoction.

    It is a way to get around the limits on individual pseudoephedrine purchases. These buyers are known as smurfs, and what they are doing is against the law.

  • No more subsidies for animal products

    Nearly 240 years ago, our founding fathers declared our national independence from Great Britain. This Fourth of July, let’s declare our independence from the meat industry.

    More than 60 percent of U.S. agricultural subsidies pay for meat, dairy and egg production. Fresh fruit and vegetable farmers receive less than 1 percent of the total. It’s time to declare our independence by stopping these subsidies.

  • Karen Beard’s family still seeking answers, closure

    Karen Farmer Beard was born in 1955 and murdered in 1991 in Kingston.

    We believe someone living in or around Kingston knows who, why and where this happened.

    What a lot of people don’t know is that this was a double murder; you see, Karen was 7 1/2 months’ pregnant at the time of her death.

  • Emotion range last week is one for history books

    What a cathartic week for American freedom.

    First, the president singing “Amazing Grace” at the funeral service in Charleston, S.C., showed he and I share something in common: a barely passable singing voice.

    But he was sincere, I believe, and put the bully pulpit of his office to good use during the eulogy.

  • Cage free a good move, but egg free’s even better

    McDonald’s pledge last week to start using cage-free eggs is only a small step in preventing staggering suffering endured by millions of birds.

    Hatcheries that annually supply 200 million female hens for U.S. egg production, including cage-free, also kill the same number of male chicks at birth by grinding them up alive in industrial macerators or suffocating them slowly in plastic garbage bags.

    The female laying hens endure a lifetime of misery, crammed with 5-6 others, in small wire-mesh cages that cut into their feet and tear out their feathers.

  • Modified TVA landfill another disaster waiting to happen

    During the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rollout of three plans to remediate the 2008 Kingston Fossil Plant dike failure, a fourth option was offered by the public that the remaining ash in that cell be left in place.

    Craig Zeller with the EPA, who was representing TVA, originally didn’t think
    that was an option.

    The EPA/TVA assured by us that the current elevation would never exceed the current permitted elevation.

    This Plan 4 was adopted by the EPA/TVA and executed.

    While I didn’t agree with the entire plan, I believe this was the right decision.

  • American foreign policy causes reader concern

    The weather has been so pleasant and the lake views so enchanting as to nearly make one forget the significant news of the day. I’m referring to the heavy weaponry being readied to go to Ukraine to bolster that country’s defenses against Putin’s continuing aggression. It appears Putin is set on re-establishing the USSR.

  • Kingston firefighters went above and beyond

    The smoke detector in the upstairs hallway of our building began chirping 24 hours,  night and day.

    An upstairs resident notified the landlord, but no one ever came to fix it.

    It was time for justice and truth to be carried out in Roane County, and it was — by the Kingston Fire Department. They were quick to arrive when called on April 24, and it turned out it wasn’t a bad battery but a faulty unit, which firefighters replaced in less than 30 minutes. I personally witnessed the character of these fine men of honor.