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Letters

  • Smoky’s death may not have been in vain

    We loved a solid gray cat named Smoky. Just a cat, you may say, just another cat. But he became a family member about nine years ago.
    He’d been in a fight for his life. His left eye was swollen with infection. He was a mess and skinny.
    Doug, my husband, took him to the vet and had him fixed up and “fixed.”
    On May 11, Smoky wanted out, and as usual, Doug called out to me, “‘Smokes’ is out.”

  • Easter event a success thanks to these donors

    Harriman Fire Deportment held its annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 23.
    More than 300 participants entered this year. This event would not be possible without the hard work and dedication of the Harriman firefighters and the many sponsors who make it happen.
    We wish to thank the following sponsors who made this event a big success:

  • Watch what you do with wrecker companies

    I recently had a vehicle accident on Interstate 40 around the area of the Roane County Industrial Park. My car was towed to a local wrecker and used car sales company.
    I asked the tow-truck driver about paying him then. He stated “Don’t worry about it; the insurance company will pay for it.”
     I sent another wrecker service to pick up the car at the request of my car insurance rep to have the car towed to my house.

  • An apology to some, but not all on foodstamps

    I sincerely apologize for harping on food stamp recipients in my last letter.
    Obviously there are plenty of over-weight children in America who have never benefited from food stamps.
    What disturbs me is how much heavier children are now compared to 40 or 50 years ago.
    My title for the piece was “Are We There Yet.” It was meant to be a humorous comparison between now and way back then.
    Having said that, I am glad it has inspired some debate on the issue of over-weight children.

  • Bigger newer schools not most important thing

    Heart and soul.
    This is what I call our school here at Walnut Hill — our heart and soul.
    It has been the heart of our community, our teachers, our children and our families for many, many years.
    At the end of this month, it will be closing for good, and all the wonderful children who have passed through her doors will be a thing of the past.
    The wonderful memories we all have shared, the backbone of our community, and one of the best educational institutions in Roane County will be gone.
    It has devastated our family here at school.

  • ‘Concern’ for the poor gives writer goosebumps

    Did you ever get the feeling you were being watched? When your skin crawled and chills surged up your back as if an icy hand had suddenly been thrust against your bare flesh?
    If you have, you can relax and continue grocery shopping.
    It could just be a recent letter-to-the-editor writer of Harriman being himself and “noticing” what other people buy in the grocery store.

  • He has a proposal for those who are poor, overweight

    I was surprised to hear the mayor of New York propose limiting the amount of soft drinks a food stamp recipient could buy with food stamps. This is something that has bothered me for years.
    I do quite a bit of the shopping in my family and being a nosey person, I have a habit of watching and listening to other people. Sometimes it irritates my wife when I can hear a conversation at the table next to us, but I can’t keep up with what’s happening at my own.

  • Energy policies need serious updating

    I like Gerald Largen’s column, but his constant Republican bashing is getting a little old.
    Democrats aren’t any better.
    Both parties seem to do nothing but argue and get little done. The last-minute midnight-hour budget passing that has become so common is a perfect example.
    Mr. Largen’s contention that the national debt is no big problem is, I think, very wrong. It’s the interest on the national debt that has to be paid.

  • Congregation at KUMC is what makes the church

    Black smoke pouring from the back of the roof lines; fire trucks from many places; lights flashing, blinking red; police cars strobing blue.
    Elizabeth, Pastor John Anderson’s daughter, bringing a box of tissues all around, smiling encouragingly.
    Congregation members gathered in tears, heartache with helplessness, and with words of love and support in the smoky, twilight air.
    These are my thoughts and impressions of the evening of Saturday, April 30, when Kingston United Methodist Church caught fire.

  • Wandering dog is safe thanks to people who cared

    Just before 3 p.m. last Friday, I was waiting for my niece to deliver an early supper from Cracker Barrel to my curb at 629 Unaka St.
    My 12-year-old Boston terrier, Blackjack, was with me as usual. He decided to go to the lot across the street.
    He does this very often, but he then decided to go on down to the house on the alley — all the time I am calling him and even went across the street to call him back, but to no avail.
    He went across Tennessee Street at the alley, and I felt he would stay there until my niece arrived, which she did very shortly.