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Today's Opinions

  • A view from Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen: When things are good, leave them alone!

    The Bureau of the Census has done its work and begun issuing reports on its findings as to the fluxuations in population throughout the nation.
    Insofar as Roane County is concerned our population has increased over the past decade by something over four percent (4.4%), to 54,181.

    Our sister county, Anderson, with which we share the two cities of Oliver Springs and Oak Ridge, increased a little less than one percent more (5.3%).
    And our southern neighbor, Meigs added six percent (6%).

  • Tennessee a bright spot in Shariah hysteria

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES
    First Amendment Center
    Recently, I sounded an alarm about rise of Islamophobia in the United States, calling attempts in various states to pass anti-Shariah legislation an attack on religious freedom.
    That inspired a good number of irate readers to sound their own alarm about what they view as my naïve and dangerous dismissal of the threat Shariah (Islamic law) poses to the United States.

  • State Rep. Julia Hurley’s Capitol Week Review

    The “Tennessee Health Care Freedom Act” passed the House this week, meaning the legislation is now on its way to the Governor for his signature.
    This bill’s passage is part of a larger effort by the General Assembly to not only encourage job growth, but protect the valuable jobs already in Tennessee.
    The legislation was an integral piece for many legislators’ agendas over the last two years.

  • IMPRESSIONS by Johnny Teglas

    Spring’s a comin.’
    I mentioned that last week in this space.
    And on Sunday evening at 7:41 p.m., that’s exactly what happened.
    Old timers in these parts warn me not to get too excited.
    After all, the running joke is that if you don’t like the weather in East Tennessee, just give it a minute.
    Spring actually kind of “sprung” on us several days earlier.

  • Census results indicate a lack of long-term plan

    In the March 18 issue, you published census data for Roane and surrounding counties.
    Roane seriously lagged behind with growth of just 4 percent compared to Loudon at 24 percent, Blount at 16 percent, Cumberland at 19 percent and Knox at 13 percent.
    I am a newcomer to this area, having moved in 2010 from Dallas, Texas to this beautiful county that is blessed with the most wonderful natural resources, lake and mountain vistas that are feasts for the eyes.

  • Second Chance thanks those who gave it a chance

    Second Chance K-9 Rescue would like to thank everyone who helped make our 12th annual Chili Supper a great success.
    Especially the good folks at Roane County News and other media for the advertising. The proceeds from this event help the animals of Roane County.
    Our animal shelter adoption spay/neuter assistance program began September 2009, and has helped pay for the spaying, neutering and an annual vaccination.
    Since February 2010, Second Chance K-9 Rescue has provided assistance for 151 animals.

  • Event to help flooded food bank a success

    On Feb. 28, flooding destroyed food and supplies at the Second Harvest Food Bank warehouse in North Knoxville. On its behalf, an ice cream social fundraiser was held, hosted by the Roane County Democratic Party and Market Street Fountain at Ladd Landing in Kingston.
    Nearly $500 was raised. Many thanks to those who contributed or volunteered.  A small number of people can make a difference for people in need. 
    The event was a success, in large part, due to a front page item in the March 2 edition of the Roane County News.
    Kudos to all!

  • Why we all need to monitor officials, our government

    By KEN PAULSON
    First Amendment Center
    The Tea Party Patriots are divvying up members of Congress.
    The advocacy group is assigning its members to track every member of the House and Senate, monitoring their every legislative move.
    “We have millions of manpower hours and thousands of people willing to do heavy lifting,” Shelby Blakely, the project organizer, told USA Today.