Today's Opinions

  • Neal made a mistake, should be reinstated

    Thanks and a hearty concurrence with the letter from Brant Williams in the Roane County News concerning the error in reporting the Kingston tax rate to the state.

    While I live South of the River and do not have direct standing in regard to this issue, nonetheless it is important to the citizens of Kingston and all of Roane County that our civic governance be carried out correctly.

  • Lots of positives in this place we call home

    I’m writing this letter in response to the writer from Kingston dated March 23. Just like him, I find myself constantly writing negative letters. The reason I do that is simple. When something makes me mad, I write about it. I have dozens of articles that I’ve written but didn’t send to the paper because I don’t want people to think I’m a negative person.

  • Gentleman Tom a great ambassador for Rockwood

    I noticed in one of your newspaper articles someone was asking for good news about your town, and I would like to share some good news about a person we met when we came to visit your town.

    I would like to nominate Tom Scott as your Rockwood ambassador for greeting and welcoming visitors to your town and making them feel welcome.

    My brother, nephew and I were in town looking for cemeteries and the courthouse as we were trying to find any information on our ancestors in the Narramore/Teague families.

  • Thanks for giving youth opportunity in state capitol

    Recently, my two young grandsons served as pages for state Sen. Ken Yager during the Tennessee General Assembly’s legislative session in Nashville.

    I want to thank Sen. Yager for giving the boys this opportunity to observe the workings of our state government at first hand and to participate in a very direct way.

    Sen. Yager couldn’t have been kinder to my grandsons, their parents and to me during our visit, and we sincerely appreciate his taking time from his busy schedule to make this such a special day.  

  • GUEST OPINION: There’s still good news in journalism

    By Gene Policinski
    First Amendment Center
    The nation’s editors are gathering in Washington, D.C., for the annual convention of the American Society of News Editors — and the good news is the April 2-4 convention once again is being held in hotel meeting rooms, not on the ledges.

    Yes, there are continuing signs of economic trouble for the business of newsgathering and distribution — in particular for newspapers, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism.

  • A View from Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen: Legislature’s policy is to promote ignorance

    Regular readers will recall that as late as 6 February we wrote a scathing critique of Scott DesJarlais’s misuse of our tax money to finance his re-election campaign through federally paid mailings of flyers masquerading as information, but which were nothing more than campaign literature. Some of our Republican friends were unhappy with this criticism of their fair-haired boy. (Oops, as Gov. Rick Perry would say, we forgot. Dr. Scott is as hairless as a Mexican hairless pup, as the many colour photos in the flyers show.)

  • Kingston’s debt rating fantastic — or is it?

    What great news to hear Kingston Mayor Troy Beets proclaim savings on current loans of “roughly $59,000 in fiscal 2013 and $56,000 in 2014.”

    Let’s hope city council members remember whose money is being saved and gives taxpayers a $60,000 break when they work out those draconian tax increases they recently announced.

    Also, here’s a question for someone in the know.  

    We understand Ms. Eleanor Neal was suspended for making a typographical error in reporting Kingston’s tax rate to the state.  

  • GUEST OPINION: Dissenting judge makes sense in case against kid

    First Amendment Center
    Dissenting opinions obviously don’t have the force of law that majority opinions do.

    But that doesn’t mean they aren’t better reasoned. Recall that Justice John Marshall Harlan (the first one) was known as “the Great Dissenter” in part for his solitary dissent in the abhorrent Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), in which the Court sanctioned segregation and the noxious separate-but-equal doctrine.