Today's Opinions

  • GUEST OPINION: State open records laws riddled with loopholes, more

    Kent Flanagan, director of the Tennessee Coalition of Open Government, reminded TCOG followers on Twitter recently that the Tennessee General Assembly has added more than 350 exemptions to the state’s open records law over the years.

    Those exemptions are scattered throughout Tennessee Code Annotated, not codified in any one place in the Tennessee Public Records Act.

  • Once again, suicide plays out in the news

    In one of these columns some months ago, we explained why the suicide of a local woman was not mentioned — outside of a simple obituary — in this newspaper.

    In contrast, last week a case of suicide was splashed prominently across the top of the front page of our June 1 edition.

    Why the difference?

    The suicide of J.T. Woods was big news for a number of reasons.

    Primarily, it was news because Woods was a public figure, a man running for the office of property assessor.

  • Nebraska man fondly recalls Temperance Town

    I just want to thank you for giving me the opportunity to express my thoughts and feelings in your paper.

    My brother and I share a subscription to the News as a way of keeping up with the goings on in Harriman, Roane County and Tennessee.

    I really liked your coverage of the Princess Theatre reopening. I remember the grand lady, and I’m sure she still is. I spent many Saturday afternoons slouched back watching the show.

    I’m looking forward to taking a look this year.

  • GUEST OPINIONG: Judge’s Facebook ruling flawed

    First Amendment Center
    I “like” the First Amendment.

    And Bruce Springsteen. And the Chicago White Sox.

    In fact, you’ll find my “likes” on Facebook pages devoted to news, sports and music.

    All along, I’ve believed I was sharing my positive opinion of the people and organizations behind these pages. But now comes a federal court saying that clicking on the “like” button is not free speech after all.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET by Gerald Largen: Lincoln’s out and Reagan’s in at GOP event

    Well, gentle reader, continuing with our long-standing tradition, we attended the Republican Party’s Annual Dinner last Saturday Evening.

    These dinners were previously called “Lincoln Day” Dinners, but this year the name was changed to “Reagan Day Constitution Dinner,” the reason for which is still unclear to your humble servant.

    Considering the role played by Mr. Lincoln in the establishment and continuation of the Republican Party, it strikes us as a bit strange that his name should be stricken.

  • Rockwood finance issues bring up several questions

    I was just responding to the article about Rockwood’s finances.

    If they’re having money problems, why are they eliminating one person’s salary and then increasing somebody else’s by $13,000.

    Who is Becky Ruppe?

    Where did she come from?

    Why does she deserve a $13,000 increase after a couple of months on the job?

    What are her personal finances like?

    Probably the most important question is, who does she know to get this job?

    Jane County

  • Peggy Evans is about honesty, integrity, service

    The recent letter about Peggy Evans was written in a sophmoric manner (conceited; overconfident of knowledge) and poorly informed.

    The diatribe was prolonged and bitter and had to have been based on ignorance of the contributions of Dr. Tom Evans, his wife, Peggy, and their entire family, who are longtime Roane Countians.

    Dr. Bert Cunningham and I have known Dr. Tom and Peggy before they completed undergraduate studies at Carson-Newman medical school and through years of service since we moved here in 1961.

  • Secret money altering the vote in our country

    There’s a flood of secret money now in American politics.

    Unlike a real flood, though, we can’t tell where this money’s coming from.

    That’s because corporations, unions, lobbyists and special interests can now spend millions to get the elected officials they want into power.

    And right now, the law lets them do that in complete secrecy.

    U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and U.S. Sen. Bob Corker can make things right.

    Senators, tell us you’ll lead the fight to stop the secret money.