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Today's Opinions

  • GUEST OPINION: Something was missed in debate in Arizona

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer’s veto last week of SB 1062 — a controversial “religious freedom” bill few Americans read and even fewer understood — may well have been a defining moment in the history of gay rights in America.

    Post SB 1062, it will be politically difficult, if not impossible, to pass laws that are perceived to allow discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation — even to protect religion, even in red states with Tea Party-favored governors.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: Is Bryan College trying for new monkey trial?

    Gentle reader, before we get started on today’s topics, we would like to mention to you a brief thing we heard on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition on Tuesday, a week ago, at approximately 7:40 a.m.

    The segment was about the up-coming Louisiana Senate campaign, and specifically about Sen. Mary Landrieu and the effect her vote for Obamacare might have on the outcome.

  • Bingo arrest of elderly ladies backfired on police

    The bingo article in the Feb. 26 edition of the Roane C0unty News brought back some memories of a true story that happened in Sumner County (Gallatin) while I was a resident of the county.

    Apparently bingo was considered a form of gambling by the state of Tennessee back in the 1980s. I can’t remember the exact year, but bingo was legal in Kentucky at that time.

    An elderly women’s club, a group who loved their bingo, had chartered a bus to take them to a Kentucky bingo parlor for a relaxing, leisurely, fun day of bingo.

  • He’d like to know the origin of Common Core

    I agree with the goals stated in the article about changing school standards in the Feb. 14 edition of the Roane County News.

    Our Tennessee students need to be prepared for life. State governors favor them.

    Forty-five states have adopted them.

    Local schools director Gary Aytes said the federal government did not initiate them.

    My question is where did these these Tennessee state standards originate? The headline makes it sound like they are a product of Tennessee educators.

  • Through pancakes and support, lives can be changed

    The Rotary Club of Kingston hosted our annual pancake breakfast and silent auction on Feb. 8. More than 200 people were served, as folks enjoyed food and visited with their friends and neighbors in what has become an annual tradition.

    Funds will be used to support service projects such as providing dictionaries to each third grade student at Midway and Kingston Elementary Schools; awarding a scholarship to a nontraditional student at Roane State; and helping to provide kidney transplants for low-income children in Mexico.

  • Blinking lights to warn about police might backfire

    This is a rebuttal to Gene Policinski’s First Amendment Center column last week about how blinking headlights to warn of a police officer ahead may be legal.

    It may be your man-given right, but it is not God’s.

    Are you the type of person who loves to help your fellow man?

    How about that man, woman or teenager who has had too much to drink, or too much in the form of drugs, especially marijuana?

  • School prayer push more about power than it is blessings

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES

    First Amendment Center

    Never say die.

    That must be the motto of politicians, religious leaders and school leaders who keep pushing for state-sponsored prayers in public schools more than 50 years after the Supreme Court struck down the practice as a violation of the Establishment clause of the First Amendment.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET:Now choice GOP criticism is ‘It’s a job killer’

    Few of our readers are as long in the tooth as the old curmudgeon, thus they will not share his recollection of events and conditions over the past seven decades, so it is not amiss for him to point out a few things he has observed on the political scene in that time period.

    For instance, our Republican friends have always had a pretty universal theme, that all loyal members are expected to voice constantly and consistently.