.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • ‘Sunflower’ still blooms in hearts of one couple

    Charles Miller was a sunflower, an angel on this earth.
    Doug and I visit two nursing homes each Monday. One is Renaissance Terrace in Harriman, and the other is The Bridge at Rockwood.
    I met Charles Miller in Renaissance Terrace about two years ago.
    I met a man with cerebral palsy and other major health problems. He was a joy to meet!
    He always smiled whenever I came into his room. Because of his disability, at first I couldn’t always understand him, but later I could hear what he was saying.

  • YOU are a winner if you went to the polls and voted

    Did you vote?
    Kudos if you did.
    Whether your candidates were successful or every one of them was beat, you deserve credit for participating in the Democratic process.
    A democracy will quickly unravel if its citizens give  up their freedoms — and their obligations to participate in the selection of their government.
    Voters are the biggest freedom fighters of all.
     

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: I realized something on the long drive home

    Last weekend, I traveled to Bowling Green, Ky., to receive the Herald Award for Outstanding Contributions in Journalism.

    For me, it was a big day.

    I had not been back to the campus of Western Kentucky University, which now simply goes by WKU, in decades.

    My head and heart were aswirl with memories and emotions. I was remembering the people I had known there; my mistakes and my successes.

  • IMPRESSIONS: Familiarity in bumper-to-bumper madness

    Poking along in post-game traffic following a Bowl Championship Series (BCS … a.k.a. the “big boys”) college football game between two major universities can be monotonous.
    Anyone who’s traveled half an hour or so up the road to catch the Vols at Neyland Stadium knows exactly what I mean. Half an hour can easily turn into several in next to no time; especially afterward.
    You don’t ever need to get in a hurry. And, um, you’d better make sure you “go” before you get going.

  • Misusing religion to bash for votes

    By Charles C. Haynes
    First Amendment Center
    Thomas Jefferson may be an iconic Founder today, but in the 1800 presidential campaign he was widely condemned for being an “atheist in religion and a fanatic in politics” who (it was rumored) had a secret plan to confiscate all the Bibles in the land.
    Sad truth be told, rumors, smears and nasty debates over the religious affiliation, or lack thereof, of candidates for office have marred American political campaigns since the early days of the Republic.

  • The triumph of trash over respectful social restraint

    Gentle reader, not for the first time, we call your attention to the French expression “Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose.”
    This is usually translated as “The more things change, the more they are the same.”
    This truism was brought to mind once again as we have been reading a book detailing the life of Henry Temple, Second Viscount Palmerston, 1739-1802.
    He was the father of the Third Viscount Palmerston, 1784-1865, who was Queen Victoria’s Foreign Secretary for 15 years and twice her Prime Minister.

  • A view from Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen

    Gentle reader, not for the first time, we call your attention to the French expression “Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose.”
    This is usually translated as “The more things change, the more they are the same.”
    This truism was brought to mind once again as we have been reading a book detailing the life of Henry Temple, Second Viscount Palmerston, 1739-1802.
    He was the father of the Third Viscount Palmerston, 1784-1865, who was Queen Victoria’s Foreign Secretary for 15 years and twice her Prime Minister.

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: And now you know

    I’m celebrating an important one-year anniversary on Oct. 26. And in a way, many of you regular readers have been a part of it.
    I’ve lost more than 140 pounds since my highest post-thyroid cancer weight, when steroids and other complications left me swollen, stiff-jointed and moon-faced.
    I told you of my cancer then, almost three years ago, because it felt important for me to do so. Cancer is so often whispered about, but by openly talking about it, I felt I was confronting an enemy head on.