.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • OUR OPINION: Education Matters! needs our support

    Last month, The Roane Alliance kicked off an effort to save a program that every Roane Countian should embrace.

    The Education Matters! initiative is in danger because of substantial government funding cuts. It needs more support.

    The aim of Education Matters! is to ensure every child in Roane County goes on to a post-secondary school … and does well when they do.

  • LETTER: Bigots wrongly think they can speak for us

    No, racism isn’t dead. It isn’t even sleeping. It is hiding behind closed   doors of houses built with cow’s dung.  It is just as strong and ugly, and it raises its head to announce things, opinions and people it will not tolerate.

    What arrogance to make personal decisions for someone else because their own fragile senses are offended.

    A cereal company had the audacity to include a mixed-race couple with a child in their commercial.

    The cow’s dung house exploded with anger and indignation.

  • Congressional investigations must be done right

    By Lee H. Hamilton, Center on Congress
    By my count, 11 separate Washington investigations are looking into the three big issues besetting the Obama Administration right now: Benghazi, IRS targeting of Tea Party groups, and the Justice Department’s pursuit of national security leaks to Associated Press reporters.

    That’s a lot of scrutinizing by any measure.

     Don’t get me wrong.

  • GUEST OPINION: More on media and government secrets

    By Gene Policinski, First Amendment Center
    Will the government ever do it — charge a reporter under the Espionage Act with endangering national security for disclosing classified information?

    No journalist ever has been prosecuted for receiving and writing about such leaked information. Two recent controversies raised questions of how far the Department of Justice officials might go in investigations of such “leaks.”

    But President Obama clearly stepped back from taking the issue to any constitutional cliff.

  • LETTER: School-shooting security increase is unnecessary

    Should we raise taxes and spend huge amounts of money on beefed up security in our schools — NO!

    Here’s why:

    Since 2000 the United States has averaged 2.46 school shootings per year, including shootings where no one, including students, were injured or only the shooter died (suicide).

    The chances of any particular K-12 school in the United States experiencing a shooting incident in any given year is approximately 1 in 53,925.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: We are all subject to the standards of our times

    Jon Meacham, a nationally known journalist with deep-rooted ties to Chattanooga, who has turned to the role of biographer, notably a widely praised life of fellow Tennessean Andrew Jackson, has just recently released his latest effort which is about our third president, Thomas Jefferson.

    John Seigenthaler, long-time editor of the Nashville Tennessean, had Meacham as a guest on his PBS programme, A Word on Words, this past weekend to discuss this new book.

  • Swift apology wanted for Largen’s tea party attack

    My usual policy regarding Gerald Largen’s columns is to ignore them as a waste of time and a danger to healthy brain cells, but when he attacks me or my Roane County Tea Party associates directly, as he did last Friday, I reluctantly wade into his ramblings.

    The silver lining in this whole IRS debacle has been the fact that some people who had formerly put complete trust in the righteousness of an all-powerful central government have had their eyes opened to what happens in the real world when real people are given too much power over their fellow citizens.  

  • GUEST OPINION: Legislative prayers are a murky situation

    By CHARLES C. HAYNES
    First Amendment Center
    When the U.S. Supreme Court declared legislative prayers constitutional 30 years ago, the justices sent a convoluted message to legislatures, city councils and other government bodies:

    You may open your sessions with prayer, a tradition that dates back to the founding of the Republic.  But don’t exploit the prayer opportunity “to proselytize or advance any one, or to disparage any other, faith or belief.” (Marsh v. Chambers, 1983)