.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • American-made motorcycle bags cheaper, sturdier

    Roane County School’s requisition to purchase mailbags to transfer school and courthouse mail at a cost of $1,170.00 is asinine. 
    Essentially, they are asking to spend $585 per bag for the equivalent of two Harley Davidson saddle bags, and they probably won’t be sewn as well as regular Harley Davidson products.
    My family and I grew up in the textile business, and my brother still runs the leather goods company that makes a percentage of Harley’s leather goods. 

  • Teachers’ pay is hard-earned and well-deserved

    I listened with interest to the discussion of the Roane County School Board at its monthly meeting last week, but was even more interested in comments within the crowd.
    When the salaries of the teachers and other instructional staff were mentioned, a gentleman sitting near me pointed out that teachers in Roane County are paid the 15th highest rate in the state.
    I detected some disdain in his voice.
    I wanted to stand up a shout, “You bet they are, and they deserve every penny and more!”

  • School board members need to open their eyes

    Kudos to the Roane County News staff and County Budget Director Kaley Walker for bringing to light the new $585 mailbags to be purchased by our director of schools, Gary Aytes.
    The article describing how Mr. Aytes is considering the purchase of two designer briefcases made in Italy doesn’t look good for a director who is agonizing over what he can cut from the school budget since no property tax increase was approved, and therefore, the school budget is looking at a huge shortfall.

  • Sharpton taking advantage of Martin outcome

    Trayvon Martin’s death has triggered the Rev. Al Sharpton to instigate a national response.
    The weekend talk shows have this upheaval front and center and it will sizzle on the skillet of public opinion until the next newsy event, probably the arrival of Kate’s baby.
    So what will all this demonstrating and talking achieve?
    Nothing, I suspect, since the vast majority of the general public has already moved on and understand why the verdict was “not guilty.”

  • America’s favorite freedom involves words, not bullets

    By KEN PAULSON
    First Amendment Center
    What is America’s favorite freedom?  It’s freedom of speech by a wide margin, according to the annual State of the First Amendment survey.
    About 47 percent of those polled in the First Amendment Center survey said freedom of speech is the most important right, almost five times the number citing second-choice freedom of religion, named by 10 percent.

  • OUR OPINION: $585 bags are like gold toilets ­to taxpayers

    We’ve long been a supporter of good, well-compensated teachers.

    However, we share every taxpayer’s distaste for wasteful adminstrative spending.

    That’s why we’re utterly disgusted with Roane County Schools’ plan to buy two fine Italian leather briefcases at $585 each to shuttle mail to the central office.

    Schools Director Gary Aytes seemed untroubled by the potential expense.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: Character of Dr. Muhammad Morsi is discussed

    As promised last week, we will give some details about Dr. Muhammad Morsi, principally about a visit paid him by the author of Mullahs, Merchants, and Militants, by Stephen J. Glain, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 2004. Mr. Glain is a former Wall Street Journal Middle East correspondent. His meeting with Morsi is set out in his book on pages 268 to 275. It took place primarily at Dr. Morsi’s office at Zaqaziq University.

  • OFF the CUFF: Discovery of a Star-Spangled nightmare

    Do you know the words to The National Anthem?

    I’ll give you a hint: It starts with, “O! Say, can you see ...?”

    Francis Scott Key’s poetic response to America’s victory at Fort McHenry during the War of 1812 is officially known as “The Star-Spangled Banner.” It was officially designated as our national anthem by congressional resolution signed by President Herbert Hoover in 1931.

    In my youth, learning the lyrics to this iconic bit of history was akin to learning the Pledge of Allegiance.

    I thought that was the case nationwide.

    Apparently not. At least, not nowadays.