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Today's Opinions

  • LOOSELEAF LAUREATE: Life was over the top at Cumberland Gap

    Most people in these parts are familiar with the history of Cumberland Gap and its importance as a route to open up frontier country.
    My history with Cumberland Gap is personal — I lived there for several years in my 20s. I loved it, especially around this time of year.
    On crisp autumn days, I could look out the kitchen window in my second-story apartment and see the people — tiny in the distance —on the Pinnacle Overlook at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park.

  • A View from Lick Skillet by Gerald Largen: What hath the great god GOP wrought?

    As you know, knowledgeable reader, the Republican Party finally achieved their goal of complete control of the legislature last year.

    This control was supposed to have numerous glorious consequences too numerous to enumerate, but, in short, we were to have entered a new golden age; an age in which miracles would be so numerous as to be commonplace.

    Had the victors in this power play been folks of outstanding statesmanship, or sense, or perception, possibly the outcome might have been as advertised.

  • Cain tax plan would double state sales tax

    Just when you thought it was safe to go to back to the store, Republican candidate Herman Cain wants to slash rich folk’s taxes and stick it to the poor.

    I already pay more than 9 percent in sales tax, and he wants to double it.

    To our credit, people are already saving more and spending less.

    Who believes that a 9-percent increase in prices won’t further curb people’s appetite for consumption?

    Think about it, $6,000 tax on a new car!

    Cain defends this tax by saying it will only be on new stuff.

  • Jim Hines deserves nod for serivce

    We are pleased to see that Rockwood has fielded an ample pool of qualified candidates for the city administrator job.

    We expect that city council members will have a harder time than usual eliminating candidates to get down to their final choice.

    However, we cannot let the retirement of former city administrator Jim Hines pass without comment.
    Hines served both the cities of Rockwood and Harriman loyally and with integrity for many years.
    We know him to be a man of intelligence and depth.

  • Nuts & Bolts by Terri Likens: Tri-weeklies are weird animals in news business

    Roane County News publishes three times a week — on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, when the post office delivers it to subscribers.

    However, except when holidays alter our schedules, we actually print those newspapers on Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday, when you can find the latest editions in stores and newsstands.

    For people who are used to the schedules of a daily or once-a-week newspaper, tri-weeklies and the demands of their publishing schedules can be confusing.

  • Some elaboration from the top on the Midway Solution

    Recently, the Midway community celebrated a ribbon cutting on the use of the Midway Middle School’s kitchen and gym.

    During the celebration ceremony, I gave a brief history of how the project was conceived, supported and construction of Phase 1 and Phase 2 had taken place. 

    A number of people commented afterward about not knowing this history and appreciated hearing the process. 

  • RSCC Playmakers is a real plus for the community

    We attended the Roane State Community College Playmakers’ production of “The Rainmaker” on Saturday evening.

    As always, Michael Golebiewski directed a top-notch performance which we enjoyed very much. 

    We also got to listen to the live performance of music before, during and after the play.

    We are so fortunate to have the Playmakers right here in Roane County!

    Celia Simon and Richard Evans
    Kingston

  • U.S. turned own guns against WWI vets in 1932

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    The “Occupy Wall Street” movement and its rapidly spreading urban echoes are — like the Tea Party movement — grand examples of Americans using at least two of our lesser-known First Amendment freedoms: assembly and petition.

    Regardless of how you feel about either or both movements, they are the latest examples of the role of protest in American politics and society. In the history of protest, there are both lessons to be learned and mistakes to be avoided.