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Today's Opinions

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET by Gerald Largen: Facing plain truths about oil prices, and Islam

    Well, here we go again, kind reader, — caught up in the net of nefariousness woven by the big oil companies and their Wall Street speculator/bail-out beneficiary, allies — in a constantly escalating upwards ride in the gasoline price balloon.

    Remember last time, when all the wise talking heads “explained” to us dummkopfs how the price rise was all simply an aspect of the free enterprise system, governed by the law of supply and demand?

  • Religious liberty and politics — tread carefully

    Everyone wants religious liberty for themselves, but that does not mean they believe in religious liberty.

    Religious liberty exists only when people give to others the same religious freedom they want for themselves.

    This recognition should be especially promoted by Christians, for Christ said, “What ever you would that others should do to you, you do the same to them.”

  • HUB late fees — just what are they needed for?

    HUB customers, beware about paying your utility bill late.

    I recently found out that if your bill is not paid by the due date, there is a penalty fee of $10.

    If your bill is not paid before your next bill is mailed out, they issue a cut off notice, which, when they deliver it to your house, costs you $20 more.

  • GUEST OPINION:St. Louis case: When is a sign free speech?

    By KEN PAULSON
    First Amendment Center
    In declining to review a ruling that invalidated a St. Louis sign ordinance, the U.S. Supreme Court has let stand an opinion that both supports freedom of speech and reinforces the core values of the First Amendment.

    In 2007, Jim Roos had a 360-ft.-square mural posted on the side of an apartment building.

    Its message: “End eminent domain abuse.”

    The city of St. Louis said the sign was too large and ordered Roos to take it down, leading to a court battle.

  • Nuts & Bolts, A discussion of how things work in the news business: Anonymous comment — keep or quit it?

    Recently, the Chattanooga Times Free-Press took steps to shut down anonymous comment on stories it posts online.

    The newspaper is still allowing comment on opinion pieces — editorials, letters, editorial cartoons — posted online.

    Managing editor Alison Gerber made this point:

  • Catholic view on contraception offered by pastor

    I would like to offer some thoughts concerning the recent government mandate requiring artificial contraception to be made available through the auspices of the Catholic Church.

    First, allow me to offer a brief explanation of the church’s position on contraception.

    All Christians recognize that God’s gift of sexual intimacy has a two-fold purpose.

    It is meant to deepen and enrich the love between husband and wife. It is also God’s way of allowing us to cooperate with God in the creation of life in accordance with God’s will.

  • GUEST OPINION: Booking photos — public record or intrusion?

    By GENE POLICINSKI
    First Amendment Center
    The mug shots of recently arrested federal prisoners are private and in most cases not available to the public, a federal appeals panel decided Feb. 22, turning back a request from the Tulsa (Okla.) World newspaper.

    The three-judge panel of the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, upholding a district court decision, rejected a number of arguments by the newspaper about the benefits of public access to U.S. Marshals Service booking photos.

  • Nuts & Bolts by Terri Likens, Editor: Suicide — should we report on it or not

    Recently, a well-liked and fairly well-known Roane Countian committed suicide.

    The person was found in her vehicle in the parking lot where she worked.

    One area newspaper ran a news story. We simply ran the obituary.

    Who was right?

    Who knows.

    How and when to cover suicide — someone’s last act of desperation — is one of the most debated topics in journalism.

    Many news outlets believe it is a private affair. To minimize the pain and suffering to survivors, they simply run an obituary.