Today's Opinions

  • Vote411.org is place to learn about voter ID

    This week marks the 47th anniversary of the signing of the Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discrimination in voting and has been instrumental in ensuring that citizens’ rights are protected from nefarious election laws.

    In Tennessee and other states, we have seen laws enacted that have the potential to undermine this vital protection. An estimated 11 percent of the population do not have the type of identification required.

    Especially impacted are the elderly, people with disabilities, low-income voters and young people.

  • Kingston couple says local heroes saved their baby

    I want to write a special thanks to all the Kingston firefighters, paramedics and the Kingston police department for helping save my 3-week-old daughter.

    They helped keep me calm when I couldn’t take anymore.

    The three times they came out, they had a very fast response time.

    I especially want to recognize Lynn Ross. He is the paramedic who made sure he was on scene and took special care of our daughter.

    Thank you again for all you guys do.

    Keep up the good work.

    Tim and Mary Austin

  • Chick-fil-A issue not one for govt. involvement

    What kind of country do we live in where a person cannot express what they believe and quote from a notable resource?

    I am referring to the restaurant Chick-fil-A and the Bible.

    Isn’t this the land of free speech?

    Isn’t this what we fought wars for? Since when do politicians choose where and what restaurants the public chooses to eat at?

    The politicians have way overstepped their bounds.

    If they want their cities to be gay-friendly, so be it, but it is not necessary to sneer at Christian beliefs to show their support.

  • GUEST OPINION: Knoxville and Memphis: When officials overreach

    First Amendment Center
    Memphis and Knoxville are about 390 miles apart, but they’re in strikingly similar territory as city officials in both try to poach the names of local citizens from newspapers.

    In Memphis, attorneys for the Shelby County Commission are trying to force the Memphis Commercial Appeal to reveal the identities of anyone who posted comments on the newspaper’s website over a 21-month span concerning the merger of city and county schools and plans by suburban communities to start school districts.

  • Financial losses are often a matter of perspective

    I have a couple of educational stories about things sometimes not being at all as they first appear.

    These lessons I’ve learned throughout life but perhaps they teach this in business school. I once worked for the state of Tennessee when construction of Interstate 40 was under way in a near county.

    The owner of the construction company doing a section of the road was quite a dapper fellow and showed up about every two weeks to check on progress being made.

  • ‘Whiners’ drive writer to go ‘eat mor chikin’

    I’m tired.

    I’m tired of a lot of things for a lot of reasons. But currently I’m tired of the whole Chick-fil-A “controversy.”

    I don’t go to Chick-fil-A very often. It’s usually crowded, and I don’t like that. They also put pickles on chicken (blasphemy!).

    I don’t like that either.

    But I’m going this week only because the gay community has driven me to it. Sorry, but it’s called spite.

  • GUEST OPINION: Cities should keep hands off Chick-fil-A

    First Amendment Center
    You and I are free to agree or disagree openly with the president of the Chick-fil-A fast-food chain over his public statements against gay marriage. The First Amendment protects his and our right to express our views.

    But when government officials take sides, they walk a much finer line between protected expression of personal views and the implication — if not open threat — of government punishment for free speech.

  • Largen column misleading on Robinette stand

    In the Friday, July 27, column by Gerald Largen, he states he has heard some disturburing news about this candidate and that candidate, all the while supporting the current property assessor. 
    Mr. Largen, having been a somewhat successful attorney, knows that putting forth conclusions built on hearsay are typically the folly of the weak. I have much respect for him and don’t see that he needed to lower his standards to for seeking the truth to support one candidate over another.