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Today's Opinions

  • Winter Blast a success thanks to contributors

    CASA’s first Winter Blast was a great success, raising more than $18,000 to help train and support our volunteer court-appointed special advocates. These volunteers are appointed by our juvenile courts to investigate and advocate for the needs of abused and neglected children.

    Many individuals and organizations contributed to the success: sponsors who helped to offset the costs, in-kind donors who provided services and prizes, and the many who bought raffle tickets and came out to see Jimmy Wayne and enjoy the festivities.

  • OUR OPINION: Pinkerton sets professionalism bar at Kingston

    The announcement of Kingston City Manager Jim Pinkerton’s retirement leaves us with mixed feelings.
    He has earned the opportunity to give up the working world and spend his free time as he sees fit.

    For that, we are happy for him and his wife, Wanda.

    On the other hand, it saddens us to think of Kingston city government without him.

    Pinkerton has been with Kingston for 12 years. He has done an excellent job advising and executing the demands of the city council and managing and taking care of city employees.

  • A VIEW FROM LICK SKILLET: Isn’t it time we defended our Western heritage?

    Gentle reader, a few days ago we were reading a book published some years ago the title of which presently escapes us, when we encountered the phrase, “The free world.” Upon reading this phrase, it struck us that this phrase which was once so frequently used, both orally and in writing, has become virtually obsolete.

  • OUR OPINION: Disruptive time changes? Let’s put them to bed

    In Arizona, except for on one or two Indian reservations, the clocks never spring forward or fall back. They stay put all year.

    We should envy those well-rested people, even if daybreak there looms before 5 a.m. at the height of summer.

    Some people are calling for a change to our spring forward-fall back system, allowing the changes begin on Saturday, not Sunday, to give people an extra day to adjust

    We have a more reasonable idea: We’re of the opinion these Draconian time changes should be done away with completely.

  • Looseleaf Laureate: Wayne Pugh remembers different storm

    Many of you know Wayne Pugh or Rockwood. I consider him a friend — I hope he feels the same way about me.

    Wayne and I have a lot in common, including the love of railroads and one very big storm.

    While many in East Tennessee consider the March 1993 blizzard the worst winter storm they ever saw, for me and Wayne, a January 1978 storm gets top billing.

    Wayne, who was with L&N Railroad at the time, shared his memories with me recently.

  • Kim Jong Un — and why isolation isn’t the answer

    Kim Jong Un is playing the same poker his father played: Do something dramatic and half-crazy to gain attention and bribes from those governments whose leaders fear he will attack south, or worse, unleash an atomic warheads on Japan or South Korea.

    Declaring the armistice null and void is dramatic and causes concern about his rationality, but such ploys have worked many times before, and in his mind, it will work again.

  • GUEST COLUMN Pity the poor children; DCS secrecy shameful

    By Kent Flanagan, Tennessee Coalition for Open Government

    Tennessee Department of Children’s Services has one of the toughest, most unforgiving jobs in state government — to protect the most vulnerable children in our society from harm — but few Tennesseans know much about the agency.

    Most details about Children’s Services operations are denied to the public by confidentiality required under state law to protect the privacy of the children and the families that come into contact with DCS.

  • GUEST EDITORIAL 1st Amendment: One woman’s lesson in liberty

    By Ken Paulson, President, First Amendment Center
    In 1940, a group of community leaders in Champaign, Ill., joined together to give young people a better moral foundation by offering religion classes in the public schools.

    It was creative, thoughtful and well-intended.  It was also unconstitutional.

    The Champaign public school district’s decision to invite representatives of multiple faiths to teach in its classrooms led to a historic U.S.  Supreme Court decision handed down 65 years ago on March 8, 1948.