Today's Opinions

  • Great kindness by anonymous donor deeply appreciated

    We would like to thank the anonymous donor who helped our family with the funeral expenses in the death of our 2-day-old daughter, Judith Mary Anne.
    To that person or persons who we only know as “friends,” there really aren’t words to express how much your gift meant to our family.
    May God bless and keep you for your kindness (Matthew 10:42 and Mark 9:41).
    Everett and Carol Phillips and family


  • We can celebrate Sunshine Week every day of year

    Tennessee Coalition for Open Government
    It’s Sunshine Week in America, the one week of the year celebrated by news organizations and open government advocates about keeping government honest.
    Watchdogs of the Fourth Estate have made it their duty to report on the actions taken by local, state and federal government.  And the Tennessee Coalition for Open Government, or TCOG, was created to preserve and improve access to public information.

  • Nuts & Bolts Terri Likens Editor: A lesson: School board tries to slip one by

    It was decades ago, but I still remember Jim Hightower’s public affairs reporting class at Western Kentucky University.

    The school had a top-rated journalism program and its teachers — and many of its students — took the subject matter seriously.

    We learned about open records and open meetings law – generally called Sunshine Laws, because they help shed light on the actions and dealings of our government officials.

  • GUEST OPINION:Diversity of conscience treasured here

    First Amendment Center
    Award-winning author John M. Barry has done it again.

    In two previous best-selling books, The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History and Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America, Barry not only told the gripping stories of two critical historical events, but he also helped shape public policy on issues of vital importance to the United States and the world.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET by Gerald Largen: What impact will Sen. Snowe’s going have?

    The rock-ribbed coast of Maine is not noted for many products — timber and paper wood, potatoes, seafood, and L. L. Bean apparel being the principal ones.

    But far and away the most important thing that has sprung from that rocky soil may well be its womenfolk.

    This thought comes to mind in view of the announcement last week that Olympia Snowe, three-term Republican senator for Maine will not seek re-election this year, thus ending more than thirty years in the Congress, both House and Senate.

  • Pickup truck to carry deceased is all volunteers have

    This is being written in reference to the Our Readers Write letter in the Dec 21, 2011, edition of the Roane County News.

    The letter being referred to was titled “Pickup Sent to Drive Away Dead Man Not Appreciated.”

    First, being members of the Roane County Rescue Squad, we would like to extend our sympathies and condolences to the family and friends of the deceased.

    Never in the past, present, or future will any member of our organization say or do anything intentionally to disgrace or shame anyone, whether they be rich or poor.

  • Call recipient made sure woman got needed help

    This is to thank the unknown person who helped me get aid in the early morning hours of Dec. 10, 2011.

    I called the wrong number because I had fallen and broken my hip, and the man I misdialed was kind enough to get the police to notify my neighbor Buster Pierce.

    To that unknown man, thank you so much — without your help, I do not know what would have happened. I was in University of Tennessee Medical Center and Fort Sanders Rehabilitation Center from Dec. 10 through Jan. 30.

    God bless you and thanks a million.

  • GUEST OPINION: Care needed when dealing with Occupy camps

    A long winter for the Occupy Wall Street movement has seen a shift in tactics by cities, towns and state legislatures seeking to remove many of the estimated 600 encampments nationwide.

    Some Occupy groups camped on public property have obtained court rulings that permit them to protest anytime in public spaces, but not to keep tents or sleeping bags on the sites. Elsewhere, formal or informal bargains have been struck that allow tents but not the accessories of camping — in effect permitting momentary shelters, not encampments.