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Business

  • While Sears struggles, locally owned store is planning for the long haul

    The decision by Sears Holding Group to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last week will not affect the Sears Hometown Store in Harriman.

    A sign on the door of the Sears store on South Roane St. said

    “Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores Inc. is not part of the bankruptcy filing by Sears Holdings Corporation.”

    The sign on the door said the store is a national retailer focused on selling home appliances, lawn and garden equipment, tools and hardware.

  • Roane, others see decrease in unemployment rates for Sept.

    Newly released unemployment data from the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development showed the vast majority of Tennessee’s 95 counties experienced lower unemployment rates in September 2018, when compared to the previous month.

    Rates decreased in 70 counties across Tennessee, remained the same in 15 counties, and 10 counties experienced a slight increase in unemployment.

    Roane County tracked with the majority of counties, with unemployment dropping slightly from 4.4 percent in August to 4.3 percent in September.

  • Free marketing on budget class is set for Nov. 8

    The Roane Alliance, in partnership with the Tennessee Small Business Development Center, will host free workshops for potential and existing small business owners and entrepreneurs.

    Marketing on a shoestring is a free seminar from 11:30 to 1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, at the Roane Alliance, 1209 N. Kentucky St., Kingston.

    Speaker will be Jutta Bangs, director of the Tennessee Small Business Development Center of Oak Ridge.

    The center advises and assists entrepreneurs and small business owners in our area at no cost to them.

  • ORNL tech supports first responders

    As hurricanes barrel toward the coastlines and wildfires rage in arid regions of the United States, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are providing critical geospatial data to support first responders as they work to save lives and property.

    When disasters strike, many homes and buildings succumb to winds, floods or flames.

  • Learn about work conflict at luncheon

    The next Roane County Employer’s Association lunch is focused on addressing conflict in the workplace.

    The lunch is from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, at the faculty dining room of Roane State Community College’s Roane County campus. Reservations are required by Friday, Nov. 9, and can be made by emailing alutz@roanealliance.org or calling 376-2093.

  • ORNL aids emergency responders with novel computing

    As hurricanes barrel toward the coastlines and wildfires rage in arid regions of the United States, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are providing critical geospatial data to support first responders as they work to save lives and property.

  • Recovered Relics

    If it’s interesting, odd, unique or vintage, Domenic Parisella either has it on the shelf at Recovered Relics at 710 N. Kentucky St. in Kingston, or he’s looking to buy it.

    Parisella and his sister Deanna Parisella-Sacket relocated from Rhode Island, bringing their love for antiques and collectibles with them.

    Their shop in Kingston is crammed full of interesting things ranging from old cameras, toys and furniture to books, pocket knives and old sewing machines.

  • Tennessee Promise needs 4,500 volunteers

    With only seven weeks remaining, tnAchieves, the partnering organization that administers Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, needs 4,500 more mentors to meet its goal of providing every applicant from the class of 2019 with a local support system. 

    Roane County needs 16 more mentors to meet student demand.

    Each TN Promise applicant is assigned a volunteer mentor who assists the student in eliminating the barriers associated with college access and success.

  • What’s the SCORE? by Dana Peterka: Cost of not quality work

    During a recent meeting with education leaders in an area county, we discussed how their four K-14 education institutions could better meet the worker skill needs of local employers.

    They discussed a common employer complaint, which can be summarized as follows: “Workers do not care about doing their jobs in a quality manner. Why don’t you teach your students the importance of doing their jobs right the first time?”

    This immediately reminded me of the teachings of a guru of Quality Management, Philip B. Crosby.

  • SWEET SURPRISES

     

    HUGH WILLETT/Roane Newspapers
    The Bettye Rose Bakery is opening soon at 105 E. Race St. in Kingston next to the Humble Bee flower shop. The store is among several new businesses opening on Race Street, including a coffee shop called Our Town Coffee Shop. Soon Kingston residents