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Today's News

  • Fishing rodeo brings out families for fun

    Roane County Park’s waterfront was brimming with children and their fishing poles Saturday for the 24th annual Dennis Ferguson Fishing Rodeo for Kids.

    Five-year-old Julie Sherlin squealed delightedly, catching her first fish ever. She dubbed it a spiky fish.

    “I like spikey fish,” she told all who would hear gleefully.

    Her mother, Jennie Sherlin, helped her big brother Thomas fish as well.

    “You are so lucky Mommy knows how to fish,” she said.

    “I am so lucky; I fish, too,” agreed Julie.

  • Rockwood utility bills to rise

    Rockwood Water, Sewer and Natural Gas customers can expect to pay more soon.

    Rockwood City Council approved first reading of an ordinance to increase rates at their meeting Monday, at the request of Rockwood, Water, Sewer and Natural Gas officials.

    “The board looked at several options trying to make it an increase our customers could handle,” said manager Kim Ramsey to the Council.

  • Area teams look for answers in scrimmages

     

    All five Roane County high school football teams have reasons to be optimistic this season as all five return at least half their starters from a year ago.

    Despite that optimism, all five still have areas of concern and Friday night all but Oliver Springs will try to answer some of those questions with their first preseason scrimmage.

  • Solar-powered house open to public at OR museum

    The Living Light Solar House, an ambassador for good design and energy efficiency while at the University of Tennessee, is now open to the public at the Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge.

    This newest exhibit was built by University of Tennessee students.

    UT donated the solar house to the Children’s Museum, where it arrived May 17.

    The new exhibit invites children and families to experience sustainability in an energy-efficient house recognized for its architectural design.

  • Well drilled in early 1900s along Obed River plugged

    An abandoned well drilled in the early 1900s on the banks of the Obed River has been plugged through a collaborative effort between Emory River Watershed Association, Tennessee Valley Authority, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the National Park Service.

    The well was at Potter’s Ford in the Catoosa Wildlife Management Area.

    Project funding was obtained by the Emory River Watershed Association from the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Environmental Restoration and Enhancement Project Program.

  • The Garden Gate: A marigold by any other name is still a versatile flower

    Classes to learn flower arranging are popular all over the world, and this great interest in flower artistry has led to the development of a great number of related industries.

    Within the last 30 years or so, the British, by their own account, have had a tremendous revival of interest in this ancient art.

    It has touched thousands of lives, raised the standards of floristry and caused a great revival of interest in the flower paintings, flower containers, books about the history of flowers and their uses, and in the development of new plants.

  • Powwow headed to Knoxville on Aug. 9

    With the theme, “The Warrior Tradition,” warriors past and present will be honored during the seventh annual Spirit of Nations Powwow from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 9 at Chilhowee Park, Knoxville.

    Veterans and active-duty personnel will be admitted free. In addition to honoring military personnel of today, Robert Eldridge of Cherokee, N.C., will have a special display related to the Thomas Legion, a primarily Cherokee Confederate regiment that spent a considerable amount of time in East Tennessee.

  • Animal-assisted therapy meeting set

    A free informational meeting for those interested in becoming volunteers with Human Animal Bond in Tennessee will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 5 in Episcopal Church of the Resurrection, Loudon.

    Doors open at 5:30 for registration.

    HABIT is an animal-assisted therapy program. It is a non-profit group of volunteers working together to promote the bond between people and animals.

  • Sip coffee, climb with ranger at Obed

    Obed Wild and Scenic River will have two programs on Aug. 2.

    Join National Park Service rangers for a free cup of coffee and informational session at Lilly Bridge from 10 to 10:30 a.m.

    The Climb With a Ranger program will be from 11 a.m.

    to 3 p.m., beginning at Lilly Bridge.

    The park will provide all gear for rock climbing. Those participating should bring drinking water and sturdy footwear.

    Depending on participant interests and ability levels, participants will travel to one of several different climbing areas around the park.

  • Budding pianists, vocalists perform

    Piano students of Nancy Skidmore and vocal students of Tommy Taylor recently performed in a recital in Kingston First Baptist Church.

    The students, with their teachers, are, front row from left, Levi Parish, Avery Parish, Savannah Turpin, Jacqueline Turpin; second row, Skidmore, Rebekah Sanders, Skye Clemmons, Toby Taylor, Declan Brewer, Tucker King; third row, Sophie King, Cynthia Roberts, Mary Beth Oliver; and back row, J.B. King, Emma Barnett, Jacob Mincke, Lauren Baggett, Rachael Baggett and Taylor.